Tag Archives: Theft

Where to hang your motorcycle helmet

When you park your motorcycle at your local cafe or service station and don’t want to carry your helmet, you are faced with a wide choice of locations to hang your helmet on your bike.

But which is the safest?

The answer may depend on your motorcycle.

There is only one place you should NOT put your helmet and that is on the ground.

Ants or other bugs could crawl in and create some havoc several kilometres down the road when they suddenly start to bite or get in your eyes or ears!

So which is the safest and best place to store your helmet on your motorbike?

Panniers and top box

Can-Am Spyder F3 Limited hang
Can-Am Spyder F3 Limited has a huge top box that stores two full-sized helmets

The best place to secure your helmet is in big, lockable panniers or a top box if you are lucky enough to have them.

These keep your helmet in the shade, away from the elements and away from prying, thieving eyes.

It also cannot be damaged by someone bumping into or even knocking over your bike.

Helmet lockHang helmet

If your bike has a helmet lock, they are quite secure.

Unfortunately, some modern bikes don’t seem to have them.

There are also some problems with hanging it here.

First, a thief can easily cut the strap and take your helmet. Yes, it destroys the helmet but thieves could just be using your helmet to steal your bike and make their getaway!

On some, your helmet may also be able to rock back and forth in the wind which could scratch its nicely painted surface, or worse, your visor.

Also, people squeezing past your parked bike might scratch your helmet or visor.

Your helmet is also exposed to the elements.

And because it is either upside down or on its side, you could come back to a helmet filled with rain, dust or even someone’s litter or cigarette butt!

SeatHang helmet

This is perhaps the easiest and most common method of temporarily storing a helmet on a bike.

Depending on the seat this can be safe or very precarious.

A passerby’s knock or even strong wind could send it tumbling and a drop from that height could write off the helmet.

It’s also very noticeable and easy for someone to steal.

Your helmet is also open to the elements, although by being the right way up, at least it won’t collect rain like it does when on a helmet lock. Just remember to close the visor!

If you do store it on the seat, the most secure way so it won’t roll off is to have the visor facing the side with the sidestand.

Tank

Like the seat, it depends on the bike and is open to the same problems of security.

Hang it on the handlebars

The quickest and easiest place to hang a helmet is on the handlebars.

This can be secure, especially if you can get it over bar-end mirrors to stop it slipping off.

However, this can still be a precarious position where the helmet can easily fall if the bike is bumped.

It could also compresses the interior foam liner if you hang it with the helmet facing down. Compressing the liner can make your helmet fit more loosely and decreases its ability to protect your head in a crash.

However, it may be ok if your helmet allows you to rest it on the chin bar as in the photo above.

You can buy special helmet hooks or use a carabiner to hang it off the bars via the Double-D clasp (if it has one).

Helmet Hook How to protect and clean your visor hang
Helmet hook

But again, you have the problem of the helmet filing with rain and dust and being stolen.

If you do hang your helmet on the bars, make sure it’s the right bar as this is safer than the left bar which slopes down when the bike is on its sidestand.

FootpegsHang helmet

The same goes for hanging your helmet on the footpegs.

It may seem more “secure” because it is not in plain sight, but I saw a pedestrian walk past a bike and accidentally kick the helmet because it wasn’t easy to see.

The helmet, rolled about 50m down the road. A write-off!

If you do hang it off the footpegs, make sure it’s on the right side, opposite the side stand, as they can slide off the down side because of the bike’s lean.

Cables and alarms

If you choose to hang or store your helmet on your bike, it may pay to secure it with a wire locking cable.

Some are made of tough titanium and some even have alarms if moved.

Check out this robust helmet lock!

Andras and Thomas Torkos wth DSD Motoring Helmet lock

Strap

If your bike doesn’t have a secure place for storage, you can always carry your helmet in the bag it came in or buy one of these convenient EZ-GO shoulder straps.

EZ-GO helmet strap hang
EZ-GO helmet strap
  • Where do you store your helmet? Leave your comments below.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

5 Best Security Gadgets for Your Motorbike

(Sponsored post on bike security for our North American readers)

Motorbikes are excellent travel options for those who cherish adventurous trips on and off the road. Moreover, it is one of the most cost-effective and eco-friendly ways to beat heavy traffic in highly populated cities. Therefore, your motorbike is an investment that you need to protect against criminals who target to take this asset away from you.

In the recent past, bike theft has been on the rise with thousands of bikes stolen in the US every year. Even though there are ways to track vehicle history to prevent buyers from buying stolen motorbikes, most of the stolen bikes are never recovered. Thieves will quickly piece out the bike and sell the parts or reassemble it on a different frame. In this article, we have compiled 5 best security gadgets to help you secure your motorbike.

Aldi motorcycle cover Aldi annual sale securityMotorcycle Cover

Thieves do not steal any motorbike; they usually spy around to identify particular models to go for. Keeping a cover on your bike hides most of the important details that the criminals could be looking for, thus making it a less attractive target. Besides, there is a time-consuming hindrance for the thief. Though the cover is a basic accessory to keep your scrambler in good condition, it also provides security benefits.

Motorcycle Anti-Theft Lock and Alarm

A bike lock is one of the most effective preventive gadgets, making the job of a thief more risky and harder. However, with the right tools and techniques can break any lock or even carried in a track but using a strong lock along with other security device or mechanism is a great way to secure your bike. Some of the recommended anti-theft lock devices include:

Fork (Steering) Lock – This makes it impossible to steer the motorbike, so the thief cannot wheel it away.

Disc Lock – A small type of motorcycle lock fitted on the brake rotor to prevent the wheel from turning.

Digital Smart Locks – It can either be the steering or the disc lock that integrates it with the alarm system. Whenever a thief tries to break the lock, it activates the alarm scaring away the thief. Some smart locks in the market like Lock8 have a Bluetooth feature, which detects when you are away from the bike and automatically activates the alarm. Additionally, the device has a motion-sensing feature that activates the alarm when it detects motion. Some even have mobile apps that will alert you when the alarm starts.

Lock theft thief stolen steal clever steal security

Kill/Stop Switch

A motorcycle kill switch disables the connection to the ignition circuit stopping the bike from starting even if the thief has keys. Not even hot-wiring will start the machine. However, some criminals know how to flip the kill switch and can easily wheel away with the bike. Hiding the kill switch is an extra step to help you prevent theft of your motorbike.

Motorcycle Chain/ Cable

Some intelligent thieves have the techniques and powerful tools to break the steering or disc lock to escape with your machine. Combining the lock with a chain or cable enhances the security of the bike, making it harder to steal. The best way to use the chain/cable lock is on the back wheel as the front can be easily removed. Additionally, it is advisable to anchor the chain on an immovable object such as a street lamppost. You may also chain through the back wheel and the bike frame.

Motorbike GPS Tracking Device

Though the above gadgets can prevent bike theft, it is never a 100% guarantee. A GPS tracking device does little to nothing in preventing your ride from being stolen. However, it is a clever investment to help you recover your scrambler in the event it is stolen. Mostly the GPS tracker is attached in a hidden part on the bike. The device transmits the live location and other details about the bike such as movement and speed to a service which you can track online from a web-based or mobile app.

Summary

Losing a valuable possession like a motorbike can be a painful experience for anyone. While the unexpected may happen to you at any time, investing in advanced bike anti-theft gadgets can save you from this pain. Other bike safety measures include removing the keys from the ignition even when you are a few metres away from the bike, locking it in your home garage and parking within your sight whenever possible.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Preventing Motorcycle Theft With Modern Technology

(Contributed post on preventing motorcycle theft)

It’s not groundbreaking news to say that motorcycles get stolen from time to time, and part of the problem is the lack of care that owners take in preventing it from happening to them. Even if by some miracle your stolen motorcycle is recovered, I think it’s safe to say that you would rather not go through the ordeal to begin with.

That’s why that old adage about prevention being better than a cure exists. If you take the extra measures necessary to secure your motorcycle, you can do a lot to discourage would-be thiefs and prevent it from ever happening.

So, what exactly are those extra measures?

Use or Install:

Motorcycle Starter Kill Switch

Most modern motorcycles come with a kill switch already installed, but if yours doesn’t you might want to get one. Kill switches are one of the most effective ways of preventing theft. Here’s how they work:

When a key is turned in the ignition, electricity begins to flow from the battery to the engine. This starts a circuit that will eventually cause the motor to engage, thus allowing fuel and air to ignite.

A starter kill switch interrupts this process by preventing electricity from reaching the spark plugs.

Installing a hidden kill switch on your bike ensures that your bike doesn’t start unless the kill switch is disabled. Make sure to shut your bike off with the kill switch because this engages the kill switch.

Disc Brake Lock

Brake locks preventing the wheels from turning will stop thieves rolling with your bike. And while it’s an effective deterrent, it takes up significant storage space and it can be quite inconvenient to install and remove, making it not as popular as an anti-theft device. People who do use them generally only do so when they’re going to be away for a long time.

Anti-Theft Alarm

While this measure is nothing new, it’s one that has proven to be effective at keeping thieves away and alerting people to the thieves that aren’t discouraged by it. Just make sure to have the alarm sensitivity tuned properly.

Do:

Park Within FOV of Security Cameras

It’s standard procedure for thieves to scout an area for security cameras before they attempt to steal anything. Parking within the field of view of security cameras helps you identify thieves if they aren’t outright discouraged.

Park Near Other Motorcycles

There are two main benefits of parking near other motorcycles. The first is that your bike is less likely to be singled out. And even if that fails, more bikes means that there’s going to be more people around the area. Riders usually look out for each other and this is often more than enough to prevent theft.

If All Else Fails: GPS Locator

While having a GPS locator installed in your motorcycle might not be much of a deterrent, you’d be happy to have it when you need it. It helps the authorities find your bike much quicker. At which point, you can recover your motorbike either by heading to where it is, of having it transported to you through motorcycle shipping if you’re overseas.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

How To Improve Motorcycle Safety With GPS Tracking

(Contributed article about GPS tracking)

Motorcycles are fun, thrilling, expensive and a preferred target for thieves, but GPS trackers will follow your bike’s location if it is stolen and help you get it back.

What is GPS tracking system and how does it work?

A GPS motorcycle tracker is basically a location tracking system that uses ground stations and a satellite network to find the exact location of the signal. Just place this small tracker device on your motorbike or any other vehicle whose location you want to track.

This device precisely tracks the location of the object to which it is attached in real time with high accuracy. This makes it easy for the owner to quickly find their stolen bike without any legal intervention.

Benefits of a GPS tracker system

Additional layer of protection

As cases of motorcycle theft have been increasing dramatically lately in the UK, it has become very important to take appropriate safety measures to safeguard your bike against theft.  Motorcycle tracking is one of the best ways that has been adopted by many bike riders.

Hassle free way to track the location

The best feature of these GPS tracker systems is that if you do not have access to a computer, you can use a tablet or smartphone to pinpoint the accurate location of the bike.

Real-time tracking of location

Installation of a GPS tracker unit gives you clear information on the location of the motorbike along with its movement at any given period of time. You can also view the previous route history up to three months in the past.

Geo-fence Zones

Geo-fence zones are virtual geographic fences that you can draw on the map so you receive a notification if your motorbike enters or leaves the area without your consent.

Mental peace

GPS tracking devices come with a movement alert feature that sends a message to the owner about any motion of their parked bike. In this way, the owner knows about an attempted theft even before the bike is taken.

Saves Money

The GPS tracking system also monitors your motorcycle, providing details about fuel consumption, range covered, etc.

Keeps your bike safe

Installing such an effective motorcycle tracking device is safer than traditional locks that can be broken, no matter how sturdy they are.

Conclusion

GPS tracking is one of the most valuable ways of ensuring the safety of your most prized possession.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Motorbike thefts up in 2018

Motorcycles thefts are up 7.3% across Australia in 2018 with many older bikes heading straight to the junk yard for the scrap metal value, says the National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council.

Thefts increased by 597 to a total of 8746 with a recovery rate of just 47%.

Council spokeswoman Caitlin Hrambanis says the biggest rises in motorcycle theft were in NSW and Queensland.

The council is currently investigating the efficacy of tougher penalties for vehicle theft.

Theft by state

State or Territory 2017 2018 % change
Thefts Thefts
ACT 126 107 -15.1% 
NSW 1679 1968 17.2% 
NT 126 82 -34.9% 
QLD 1510 1696 12.3% 
SA 521 555 6.5% 
TAS 122 141 15.6% 
VIC 2013 2092 3.9% 
WA 2052 2105 2.6% 
AUS 8149 100.0 8746 100.0 7.3% 

Opportunistic theft

“In most cases vehicle theft is almost always opportunistic, with the vehicle being stolen for short-term use and later recovered (78% in Queensland),” she says.

Unlike most modern cars which have self-alarming engine immobilisers, many motorcycles need owners to lock them with a chain, disc lock or an alarm switch.

She says they can easily be stolen without requiring any keys.

“Motorcycles have their own set of challenges due to their ease of portability, the high demand for parts and poor identification,” she says.

“Two in three motorcycles are also stolen from the home, making home security, protecting keys and considerations of where the bike is stored also important.

“In Queensland, around a quarter of all bikes stolen are off-road bikes, which often makes recovery difficult as they are not subject to a registration system.”

Brands stolenLock theft stolen Lock Insurance theft motorcycles thief reduce thefts

The most brands stolen were also the most popular brands on the market.

They were followed by many dirt bike and scooter brands which are easier to steal than heavy road bikes.

Make 2014 2018
Honda 1601 1786
Yamaha 1496 1529
Kawasaki 691 782
Suzuki 752 751
KTM 465 619
Harley Davidson 150 235
SYM 194 229
Piaggio 115 203
Kymco 120 200
Triumph 111 194
Hyosung 152 152
Longjia 196 147
Husqvarna 107 128
Aprilia 83 115
Ducati 69 91
Vespa 81 91
TGB 131 83
BMW 41 71
Polaris 53 63
Bolwell 99 61

Theft hotspots

Motorcycle theft hot spots keyring thieves miserly CCTV black friday thefts
Click here to buy your “warning” keyring

South East Queensland is the worst hotspot for motorcycle theft.

Brisbane, the Gold Coast, Logan and Moreton Bay were all in the top 10 local authority regions for bike theft.

State or Territory LGA 2014 2018 % change
QLD Brisbane (City) 292 435 49.0% 
VIC Melbourne (City) 134 246 83.6% 
QLD Gold Coast (City) 169 244 44.4% 
QLD Logan (City) 118 159 34.7% 
WA Swan (City) 119 154 29.4% 
NSW Sydney (City) 115 151 31.3% 
WA Stirling (City) 153 147 -3.9% 
VIC Port Phillip (City) 62 136 119.4% 
QLD Moreton Bay (Regional Council) 149 132 -11.4% 
NSW Newcastle (City) 44 130 195.5% 

Click here to find out what can be done to keep your bike safe from thieves.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Tougher vehicle theft penalties assessed

As motorcycle theft continues to be the one area of vehicle theft to rise, a tougher penalty system for offenders is being assessed.

Australian motor vehicle theft is down 4% in the year to October 2018, with the only sector increasing being motorcycles, up 4%.

The biggest increase was in NSW which was up 258 or 15.9% to 1878, despite the state introducing tougher penalties for rebirthing offenders in 2006.

Any rider whose has their pride and joy stolen would probably suggest tough penalties. In one previous article a reader suggested castration!

Tougher penalties

theft lock grinder steal thief tougher
Thieves caught lifting a bike on to a ute

Law enforcement agencies agree that tougher penalties are needed.

However, the big problem has been that organised criminal rings use specialist criminals for different functions of the same offence.

They include bike thieves, burglars who break into your house to steal car or bike keys, re-birthers, fencers and document forgers.

This has made it difficult to convict offenders and gang bosses or organisers. Charges were often not proven or bargained down to lesser charges, such as receiving stolen property.

At best, the conviction system was protracted with little or no joy for the victims.

In 2006, the NSW government amended the Crimes Act 1900 to introduce a new offence of knowingly facilitating a rebirthing activity carried out on an organised basis.

It would apply to any and all members in the network involved in stealing your motorcycle or car with tougher penalties.

While it seemed like a good idea, National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council figures seem to show it is not working. In fact, NSW bike theft is up almost a quarter over the past four years.

Motorcycle theft 2013-10 to 2018-09

State/Territory 2013-10 to 2014-09 2017-10 to 2018-09 % change
Thefts Thefts
ACT 109 110 0.9% 
NSW 1,506 1,878 24.7% 
NT 190 87 -54.2% 
QLD 1,354 1,619 19.6% 
SA 451 543 20.4% 
TAS 111 142 27.9% 
VIC 1,832 2,097 14.5% 
WA 2,638 2,044 -22.5% 
AUS 8,191 100.0 8,520 100.0 4.0% 

Laws assessed

Law firm DLA Phillips Fox assessed the law changes in 2010 but found many matters were still before the court. They found there had not been enough time to draw conclusions on the law’s impact.

So now the NMVTRC has engaged law firm Clayton Utz to do a second review.

They will not only consider NSW prosecutions but also identify issues that might lead to similar provisions across the nation.

A report is expected to be available by end of April 2019.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

How can we reduce motorcycle theft?

There could be nothing more heartbreaking than to have your motorcycle stolen, but what can be done to reduce the alarming rate of theft?

We recently published an article that showed a massive rise in Queensland’s motorcycle theft rate after the government opted out of the National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council.

It also pointed out that 96% of motorcycles stolen did not even have a disc lock.

But are governments and riders the only ones to blame for motorcycle theft?

Sure riders need to play their part. (See a list of things you can do to secure your bike at the end of this article.)

But governments, police, insurance companies, motorcycle dealers and manufacturers can also play their part.

Motorcycle theft has hidden costs for all of these stakeholders. It costs governments in terms of policing, it costs insurance companies in payouts and it costs dealers and manufacturers when customers are turned off riding by theft.

How to reduce bike theft

So what can they do?

Governments could supply more secure parking at bus and train carers for commuters. That means lighting, security cameras and anchor points for motorcycles. They do it for bicycles, so why not for motorcycles?

We applaud the Queensland Police Service for their awareness campaign, but police should also include patrols past known motorcycle theft locations.

Insurance companies should encourage riders to fit aftermarket alarms and use approved locking systems. They can do this by reducing premiums for those who comply. Some do, but not all.

Manufacturers should make their bikes more difficult to steal and cut up for spare parts.

While some manufacturers fit immobilisers, Harley-Davidson is the only one that fits a loud alarm as standard.

Harley-Davidson CVO Pro Street Breakout please reduce
Harley immobiliser key fob

They could also apply DataDot paint that allows police to trace the owner of a recovered stolen motorcycle and to trace stolen parts.

DataDot is an almost invisible paint that includes a code that is stored on a national database. You can add DataDot to a motorcycle for $200.

Bikes featuring DataDot paint should also feature warning stickers to alert would-be thieves.

And motorcycle dealers should encourage customers to put aside at least $50 to buy an alarmed disc lock rather than forking out hundreds for an aftermarket exhaust!

If everyone plays their part, we can reduce motorcycle theft and save money.

Here’s how you can protect your bike

  • Use a secure disc lock with an alarm and a reminder cord attached to your handlebars so you don’t ride off with it still in place.
  • Buy a secure chain so you can anchor your bike to an immovable object such as a lamp post.
  • If you park your motorcycle outside your house, consider installing outdoor security cameras or a motion sensor light near the bike.
  • Also, use the steering lock if your bike has one.
  • Park in a secure location such as your garage or behind a locked gate.
  • Consider the extra security of using the steering lock, a disc lock or chain as well.
  • Pull out a spark plug or fuse, or have an immobiliser fitted.
  • Avoid parking your bike in railway or shopping centre car parks as these are notorious for theft.
  • Park in a locked carpark. If you have to park in the open, leave it where you can see your bike or in view of a security camera and/or under a light.
  • Otherwise, keep your bike out of sight, maybe parking it behind your car. If parking in a garage, block the bike with your car and ensure the garage is locked.
  • Use DataDot, DNA+ or a security tag to identify your bike.
    thief DNA+ invisible marker rampant campaign
  • When riding home, make sure you are not being followed.
  • Stay alert for suspicious vans or trucks driving around late at night. These are used to transport stolen motorcycles.
  • Put a cover over your bike. It might slow down thieves and prevent theft of accessories. But make sure it isn’t a flashy lone with the brand name of the bike on it. That only entices thieves.
  • When riding in a group, park your bikes together.
  • Consider marking your bike in a unique way that could aid in recovery and therefore dissuade thieves.
  • At hotels or public parking spaces, try to park in view of parking lot security cameras and lights.
  • Install a motorcycle alarm and/or a hidden kill switch.
  • Buy a GPS tracking system that can track and relay your bike’s speed, location and direction.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Government blame for motorcycle theft

The former Campbell Newman Government not only disrupted Queensland’s motorcycle industry with discriminatory VLAD laws, but may also have contributed to the state’s skyrocketing motorcycle theft rate.

RACQ spokesman Steve Spalding says the state’s rising car and bike theft rate is a result of the former government’s decision to pull out of the National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council (NMVTRC) about five years ago.

Consequently, Queensland’s motorcycle theft rate has risen the most of any state. In the past 12 months it is up 10.2%, while the national rate is down 3.5%.

“It cost $200,000 a year to be part of the council,” Steve says. “But it gave us access to a lot of research, detailed analysis and effective programs such as the young offender program.”

Police Minister Mark Ryan has not replied to our request for comment about the current government rejoining the NMVTRC.

The massive rise in Queensland’s motorcycle theft rate has prompted a police and RACQ “Stop Stolen Motorcycles” awareness campaign to remind riders to secure their bike.

Motorcycle theft Senior Constable Tony Tatkovich and Steve Spalding RACQ
Senior Constable Tony Tatkovich and Steve Spalding RACQ wth a motorcycle disc lock

Theft campaign

In Queensland, the motorcycle theft hotspot is Brisbane where 232 bikes were stolen from 2012 to 2017.

Half were stolen from parking bays, 108 (47%) were taken from a residence and eight (3%) from businesses. 

Only 48% of stolen motorcycles are partially recovered. Most are disassembled and sold for parts. 

Stop Stolen Motorcycles campaign leader Senior Constable Tony Tatkovich says 96% of stolen bikes were not fitted with a security device.

Senior Constable Tony Tatkovich launches awareness campaign motorcycle theft
Senior Constable Tony Tatkovich launches awareness campaign

“The best way to prevent your motorcycle from being stolen is to take significant measures by using anti-theft devices like disc locks with audible alarms or tracking devices,” the Yamaha R1 fanatic says.

“With a loud motion sensor alarm in them they cost from about $50 and act to deter would-be thieves as well as alert the community who are witnesses to the crime.”

Steve, who is a keen Suzuki Bandit rider, says disc locks would make a “relatively inexpensive” Christmas gift for a rider.

If riders see or hear suspicious behaviour involving motorcycle theft, they can contact Policelink on 131 444 or provide information using the online form 24 hours a day. 

The Stop Stolen Motorcycles campaign consists of leaflet drops on bikes and at dealerships, as well as posters at carparks and social media.

Theft hotspots

State/Territory Local Government area Previous 12 month Past 12 months % change
QLD Brisbane (City) 2,436 2,632 8.0% 
QLD Gold Coast (City) 1,655 1,879 13.5% 
QLD Logan (City) 1,056 1,288 22.0% 
VIC Hume (City) 1,025 1,113 8.6% 
ACT Greater ACT 1,199 1,098 -8.4% 
QLD Moreton Bay (Regional Council) 860 915 6.4% 
NSW Blacktown (City) 790 810 2.5% 
VIC Casey (City) 789 731 -7.4% 
VIC Moreland (City) 663 706 6.5% 
VIC Whittlesea (City) 780 695 -10.9% 

The national decrease in motorcycle theft in the past 12 months is a big turn-around.

Motorcycle theft rose 5% in the 2017/2018 financial year while all other vehicle theft across Australia dropped, according to NMVTRC figures.

The biggest change since then has been a marked decrease in theft in Western Australia which had been the worst performing state for some time. In the past 12 months, WA thefts are down a massive 21.3%.

As well as initiatives to make motorcycles safe from theft in Western Australia, the decrease has also been the result of a decline in the state’s economic fortunes since the mining downturn. 

Here’s how you can protect your bike

  • Use a secure disc lock with an alarm and a reminder cord attached to your handlebars so you don’t ride off with it still in place.
  • If you park your motorcycle outside your house, consider installing wireless outdoor security cameras or a motion sensor light near the bike.
  • Also, use the steering lock if your bike has one.
  • Even when parked in a secure location such as your garage or behind a locked gate, consider the extra security of using the steering lock, a disc lock or chain as well.
  • Pull out a spark plug or fuse, or have an immobiliser fitted.
  • Avoid parking your bike in railway or shopping centre car parks as these are notorious for theft.
  • Park in a locked carpark. If you have to park in the open, leave it where you can see your bike or in view of a security camera and/or under a light.
  • Otherwise, keep your bike out of sight, maybe parking it behind your car. If parking in a garage, block the bike with your car and ensure the garage is locked.
  • Use DataDot, DNA+ or a security tag to identify your bike.
    thief DNA+ invisible marker rampant campaign
  • When riding home, make sure you are not being followed.
  • Stay alert for suspicious vans or trucks driving around late at night. These are used to transport stolen motorcycles.
  • Put a cover over your bike. It might slow down thieves and prevent theft of accessories. But make sure it isn’t a flashy lone with the brand name of the bike on it. That only entices thieves.
  • When riding in a group, park your bikes together.
  • Consider marking your bike in a unique way that could aid in recovery and therefore dissuade thieves.
  • At hotels or public parking spaces, try to park in view of parking lot security cameras and lights.
  • Install a motorcycle alarm and/or a hidden kill switch.
  • Buy a GPS tracking system that can track and relay your bike’s speed, location and direction.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Kobe Smart Case neatly secures your helmet

If you’ve ever had your helmet stolen from your bike or accidentally knocked or blown off your bike, then the stylish rear-rack-mounted Kobe Smart Case could be your solution.

It electronically secures your helmet to your bike when parked and neatly folds away when not in use to be visually discrete and aerodynamic while riding.Kobe Smart Case

The waterproof case not only protects your helmet from the elements, but an electronic alarm and a reinforced steel cable also protect it from thieves.

When not in use, the flexible case folds away to just 6cm to it doesn’t look ugly or cause any air turbulence.

But the Kobe Smart Case does not come cheap at €199 (about $A310, $US225).

It was developed by Infinitum Projects in Barcelona and Kobe founder and CEO Jordi Mercader ays the Kobe Smart Case will not spoil the beautiful lines of your bike.

“The best design is the smallest design,” he says.

“Less, but better because it concentrates the essential aspects and the product and is not loaded with non-essential features.”

Other Kobe products include a light and flat rider’s backpack in nylon for €99 ($A155, $US110) or leather for €129 ($A200, $US145) and a 15-litre tank bag (€149, $A230, $US170) with the same folding system as the helmet case.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com