Tag Archives: Royal Enfield

Royal Enfield adds Flying Flea, Roadster

Royal Enfield looks set for a host of new models after registering for trademarks on Flying Flea and Roadster which quickly follows applications for the names Sherpa and Hunter last month.

We suspect that these will be 350cc singles and 650cc twins as the 500cc model looks set for extinction after it is withdrawn from sale in India because it no longer meets the new domestic emissions regulations.

We speculated that Sherpa and Hunter would be great names for the 400cc Himalayan which could soon come as a 650cc variant.

Royal Enfield Himalayan Sleet invests camoRoyal Enfield Himalayan

Flying Flea and Roadster

As for the Flying Flea and Roadster, they are more likely to be versions of the 650cc.

A Roadster could lie somewhere between the sit-up-and-beg Interceptor and the cafe-racer style Continental GT.

The Flying Flea is a reference to the lightweight 250cc bike Royal Enfield produced in World War II which were parachuted into battlefields and behind enemy lines from the Horsa Glider.

In 2018, Royal Enfield paid tribute to the Flying Flea with a limited-edition military-flavoured Pegasus 500cc.

Royal Enfield Classic 500 Pegasus Edition“Flying Flea”

Perhaps the Flying Flea will be a similar style to the Pegasus, although maybe as a 650cc twin, not a 500cc single, or perhaps a 350cc version to match the original’s “light weight”.

This video gives some background on the development of the Pegasus model.

It came in two paint options (brown and olive) with replica badging and even the unique army-style serial numbers painted on the tank.

Adding to the period look were the military-style canvas panniers, leather strap with brass buckles on the air box, and blacked-out exhaust muffler, engine, rims, handlebar and headlight bezel.Royal Enfield Classic 500 Pegasus Edition

Military heritage

Royal Enfield says the Flying Flea was produced in collaboration with the British Ministry of Defence.

The bike was so light messengers could lift it on their shoulders when the trenches were too deep to be ridden over.

Royal Enfield’s military involvement has included making mobile machine gun platforms for World War I, targeting components for anti-aircraft guns in World War II and continual service with the Indian Army since the early 1950s.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Save 10% on Extreme Bike Tours Himalaya trek

Extreme Bike Tours will be on a new Himalayan Expedition from 11-25 July 2020 and is offering a 10% discount only to Motorbike Writer readers! 

This “once in a lifetime” ride that will take you in some of the most remote and dramatic areas of the Spiti Valley (pictured above) and Ladakh, in north India.

It starts in the foothills of the Himalayan range and goes all the way to Leh.

Riders will travel on some of the highest roads in the world such as the Chang La and the Khardung Lah at 5300m, visit ancient monasteries and immerse yourself in the Indo-Tibetan culture.

The price for this all-inclusive motorcycle tour through the Himalaya is $US4350 (about $A6490 on today’s exchange rate) but Motorbike Writer Followers can enjoy a 10% discount saving $US435.

The offer is valid only until 15 March 2020.

The tour includes:Save 10% on Extreme Bike Tours Himalaya trek

  • Bike, fuel & oil
  • Accommodation (tented camps & hotels)
  • All meals, snacks, drinking water & soft drinks
  • Local & English guide
  • Support vehicle
  • Mechanic
  • Spare parts
  • Domestic flights from Delhi to Chandigarh / Leh to Delhi

Choose between a Royal Enfield Bullet 500cc or Himalayan 410cc for this motorcycle adventure of 16 days on top of the world (12 days of riding). 

Although the tour has been designed to help the acclimatisation process by starting at lower altitudes and gradually ascending to higher altitude up to 5600m, it’s a physically challenging adventure and it requires some riding experience and skills.

Definitely not for the faint hearted. Are you up for the challenge?

For more info, write to [email protected] and don’t forget to claim your Motorbike Writer special discount.

We travelled with Extreme Bike Tours in Sri Lanka and can thoroughly recommend them as safe, professional and friendly operators.

2021 tour dates

Extreme Bike Tours has released its 2021 tour dates with three firsts in India, Myanmar and Mongolia.

Rajasthan “On a shoestring” is an easy budget-friendly tour which is all about the destinations.

The Road to Mandalay” in Myanmar is already fully booked but they are now looking into running a second tour.

The Mongolia Gobi Desert itinerary and logistics are now in place.

  • Rajasthan – On a Shoestring, 10-23 January
  • Hidden Sri Lanka – Ride in Luxury, 13-25 February
  • Myanmar – The Road to Mandalay (fully booked), 7-20 March
  • Bhutan – Gross National Happiness, 10-24 April
  • Himalaya – Through the Clouds, 10-25 July
  • Hidden Sri Lanka – Ride in Luxury, 10-22 July
  • Mongolia – On the Trail of Chinggis Khan, 31 July – 10 August
  • Tibet – Mt. Everest Base Camp & The Forbidden City, 6-21 September
  • Luxurious Rajasthan, 6-19 November

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Is Royal Enfield axing the 500cc models?

Tougher emissions rules in India are putting an end to the Royal Enfield 500cc engine which could eventually spell the end for the longest-running model around the world.

The 350cc models make up about 80% of RE sales with the new 650cc twins and the Himalayan now even overtaking sales fo 500cc models.

Now, with the 500cc engine failing tougher BS-6 emissions regulations in India, RE has decided it is not worth the investment to upgrade the single-cylinder engine.

So they will cease domestic sales of the Bullet 500, the world’s longest-running model, and the Thunderbird 500 at the end of March with the Classic 500 to follow.

There is no word from RE about whether production for the rest of the world will also cease.

Australian importers UMI says the “500 is continuing for export markets”.

However, it stands to reason that tougher Euro and California emissions rules could also see their eventual demise. It’s likely a matter of when, not if.

Classic 500cc Tribute BlackRoyal Enfield Classic 500 Tribute Black

Meanwhile, the company is saying goodbye in India with a limited-edition Tribute Black Classic 500 limited to local customers.

As the name suggests, it will be all-black, including the engine.

There will also be some gold touches, comfy quilted-leather touring seats and a commemorative “end of build” plate. Royal Enfield Classic 500 Tribute Black

The company has not said how many will be built, but they will be made to order so we presume they will see how many orders they get.

Indian customers will have to register online on the dedicated Royal Enfield website which only takes Indian addresses, excluding overseas buyers unless you have a friend or relative in India who can buy for you!

Customers will receive a unique code which they can use in an online flash sale on Monday  (10 February, 2020).Royal Enfield Classic 500 Tribute Black

Sliding sales

The booming Indian motorcycle market is the world’s largest but it started to decline last year as the wealthy middle class moved from bikes to cars.

While sales were down by nearly 3 million, they still sold 19.1 million motorcycles which is their third all-time highest level.

The decline in local sales has impacted heavily on Royal Enfield which was down 20% in the first nine months of the year. Full-year totals are not yet available.

It’s not all bad news for RE as their exports were up by about the same percentage although a lot fewer units.

Meanwhile, Royal Enfield has applied for the trademarks of Sherpa and Hunter which we expect could be applied to the upcoming smaller and bigger Himalayan adventure models.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Long Term Ride Report: 2019 Royal Enfield Continental GT 650

2019 Royal Enfield Continental GT 650
2019 Royal Enfield Continental GT 650. Photo by the author.

MSRP $5,999
Odometer: 1,958 miles

When Royal Enfield unveiled to the world its pair of all-new 650 twins, the Interceptor 650 and Continental GT, at EICMA in November 2017, the anticipation was already buzzing. We’d just visited its sparkly new state-of-the-art UK Technical Center on the Bruntingthorpe Proving Ground, near Leicester in central England, where the new twins had been wholly conceived, engineered and tested. We had to wait nearly a year, until September 2018, before we were able to swing a leg over each bike and take them for a spin through the redwoods at the global press launch in Santa Cruz, California (Rider, January 2019 and here), and it was shortly afterward that an example of each showed up at the Rider garage for a complete test.

Check out our Comparison Test Review of the BMW G 310 GS vs. Kawasaki Versys-X 300 vs. Royal Enfield Himalayan here!

Identical except for styling details, the Interceptor 650 and Continental GT share an all-new air/oil-cooled 648cc parallel twin, a chassis designed in conjunction with Harris Performance and standard Bosch 2-channel ABS. After a few rides we determined that both bikes not only look and feel the part, but considering their attractive price tags ($5,799 for the Interceptor and $5,999 for the GT) and three-year, unlimited-mileage warranty with free roadside assistance, they were also worth a serious look as “keepers.” The question at the forefront of everyone’s mind, however, was reliability. So we hung onto the GT for about seven months, with rides ranging from easy cruises down the coast highway, to full-on thrashing in the tortuous twisties of the Santa Monica Mountains, interspersed with stretches of just sitting in the garage as other deserving bikes got their test rides.

And it never missed a beat. The GT’s riding position is compact and sporty and the seat is about as comfortable as it looks (the Interceptor is a better choice if comfort is a priority), but leaning through the gentle curves of Highway 1, heading west out of Malibu into the setting sun, the Enfield just felt right. Goldilocks would understand. As Milwaukee-based Royal Enfield North America gradually builds a support base, the number and proximity of dealerships is the only concern for prospective new buyers, but if you’re lucky enough to have one close by, the new 650 twins are the genuine article.

Source: RiderMagazine.com

Royal Enfield plan Sherpa and Hunter

Royal Enfield has applied for the trademarks of Sherpa and Hunter which we expect could be applied to the upcoming smaller and bigger Himalayan adventure models.

The current 400cc Himalayan has been a moderate hit so 250cc and 650cc versions could also score well for the Indian company, both in the subcontinent and overseas.

Several manufacturers have produced baby adventure bikes in recent years such as the Kawasaki Versys-X 350, and there has been a host of 650cc models available for many years.

Kawasaki Versys-X 300 with Bosch 10 ABS unit confirms
Kawasaki Versys-X 300

Sherpa and Hunter

Both Sherpa and Hunter would be ideal names for extensions to the Himalayan family.

Perhaps the Hunter would be the bigger model and the Sherpa the smaller one, given the company had a 178cc  Sherpa in the 1960s.

Royal Enfield boss Siddhartha Lal has long suggested the 650cc engine from the popular Interceptor and Continental GT could be used in the Himalayan.

The Himalayan is powered by a 411cc, single-cylinder engine producing just 18kW of power at 6500rpm and 32Nm of torque at 4250rpm.

Royal Enfield Himalayan Sleet invests
Royal Enfield Himalayan

That compares with the 648cc twin from the Interceptor and Continental GT which has 35kW at 7250rpm and 52Nm at 5250rpm

Indian websites have published spy photos of disguised 650cc Himalayans being tested on local roads, so they could be close to production.

However, the trademark application is probably a little late for a 2020 release.

We suspect they are more likely to come in 2021.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Royal Enfield Bullet Trial tackles trails

Royal Enfield motorcycles are known for tackling all sorts of terrain at a slow and methodical pace, but now they have a limited-edition Bullet 500 Trial model with slightly more off-road ability.

It will be available in Australia for $9190 ride away which is substantially more than the $7690 for the standard Bullet 500.Royal Enfield Bullet Trial

The thumpers come with a single pipe that rises at a 45-degree angle, a headlight grille, slightly knobby rubber, solo seat, rear rack, bash plate and a side plate.

They come with chrome tanks with day-glo red and olive green frames.

Royal Enfield sent us this history of trials riding and Royal Enfield involvement in the sport.

Trials historyRoyal Enfield Bullet Trial

Go back to the very dawn of motorised transport at the turn of the 20th century and you will find the origin of trials, or ‘reliability trials’, as they were known.

Manufacturers used these trials to demonstrate their machines’ dependability and endurance on the rough, un-metaled highways and byways of Britain. However, when road surfaces improved in the 1920s, trials competitions went ‘off-road’ to dedicated courses, where challenging terrain provided a gruelling test for both man and machine. A trials rider had to negotiate rocky hillside tracks, traverse slippery gullies, pick out a safe line along windswept ridges, slog through claggy mud and wade across boulder-strewn rivers. Points were lost if, in strictly observed sections, a rider so much as put his foot down, a fault referred to as a ‘dab’, if he careered off course or, as often happened, he simply fell off.

The sport became a widely recognised way of highlighting the merits of one manufacturer’s machine over that of another, with tractability, manoeuvrability and, of course, reliability, paramount. Although tuned, lightened and modified where possible to give an edge, the competing motorcycles were clearly derived from standard road bikes. In the majority of cases, competitors would ride their machines some considerable distance to an event, remove the headlight and any other extraneous parts, such as pillion seat and foot rests, give their all in the trial then hopefully still be able to ride home afterwards. Riders and bikes had to be built tough!

Spectators loved the sport. At the height of its popularity in the 1950s and ‘60s tens of thousands of them would brave the worst of the British weather to attend both the club and trade-sponsored trials which took place across the length and breadth of the British countryside every weekend. The top riders were household names pursued by fans seeking their autographs and trials wins, especially in one of the more prestigious national or international events, incontrovertibly led to sales of the road- going motorcycles from which the trials mounts originated.

Bullet TrialRoyal Enfield Bullet Trial

When the Bullet was launched in 1932, the company quickly heralded it as “perfect for touring or trials” and it was soon available with optional wide ratio trials gearing. As the decade progressed, its successes racked up. In the 1935 International Six Days Trial (ISDT), the indisputable pinnacle of the sport which was commonly referred to as the ‘Olympics of motorcycling’, the Royal Enfield team was the only squad riding British motorcycles not to drop a single point. In 1937, Enfield riders won a record-breaking 37 trials trophies along with six gold medals in the ISDT, with legends such as Charlie Rogers, George Holdsworth and Jack Booker riding 250 and 350cc Bullets and the 500cc Special Competition Model to victory.

But it was in the post-war era that Royal Enfield truly came to the fore in trials, largely thanks to the all-new 350cc Bullet. Even though telescopic front forks had become de rigueur from 1945 onwards, motorcycle designers had firmly stuck to the pre-war format of a rigid rear. The Bullet broke with this tradition when Enfield’s head designer, Ted Pardoe, and Tony Wilson-Jones, its chief engineer, incorporated revolutionary swinging arm suspension with oil damped shock absorbers for the first time on any production motorcycle. The suspension’s travel was rather limited at just 2” but it was enough to give its rider improved comfort and, as far as off road grip was concerned, increased adhesion.

British motorcycle manufacturers usually unveiled their forthcoming year’s models at the all-important Earls Court Motorcycle Show, held in London each November. When he came to showcasing the new swinging-arm Bullet, Royal Enfield took the unorthodox step of revealing it at a trial, entering three prototype machines in the 1948 Colmore Cup.Royal Enfield Bullet Trial

This unexpected move was a shrewd one because the bike’s rear suspension caught everyone’s attention, including journalists from both of the UK’s weekly motorcycle magazines, The MotorCycle and Motorcycling. Both magazines published 2-page features on the bike. While victory may not have come on the course that day, it was certainly achieved in terms of publicity.

The positive showing that these new Bullets made in competitions during the following months meant that two were selected for the British Trophy team to take part in that year’s ISDT, held in San Remo, Italy. Success followed with both Bullet riders, Charlie Rogers and Vic Brittain, winning gold medals and contributing to the British team’s first place position.

The road-going version of the Bullet took centre stage on the Royal Enfield stand at that year’s Earls Court Show, and it became the backbone of the range for the following 14 years. The company’s annual sales brochures usually featured a trials variant, available to the club level rider by special order. However, pukka works machines were reserved for a select few professional riders. These were specially tuned and modified in the factory competition shop and lavished with, what were for the time, exotic lightweight materials, such as magnesium for crankcases and aluminium alloy for wheel hubs.

Johnny Brittain

Royal Enfield Bullet Trial
Johnny Brittain

Although Royal Enfield had employed a number of highly skilled riders over the years it had never had a true star. All that changed in 1950 when a precociously talented 18-year-old joined the company. John Victor Brittain, universally known as Johnny Brittain, was the son of 1920s and ‘30s legend, Vic Brittain, a multi-skilled rider who successfully competed in everything from ISDTs to TT races, scrambles and fairground daredevil stunts and who had been persuaded to come out of retirement and join Enfield for one year in order to ride a Bullet in the famed 1948 ISDT win.

Somewhat gangly, quietly-spoken and immensely dedicated, Johnny soon showed his mettle, picking up first class awards in one day trials and a gold medal in that year’s ISDT. “In the early days,” he recalls, “my competitors openly ridiculed me, deriding the spring-frame Bullet. They were still on rigid-framed bikes and would say things like: ‘I pity you having to ride that Enfield with that bouncy rear suspension.’ They were soon laughing on the other side of their faces when I began winning, and it took several years for all the other manufacturers to catch up and adopt the Bullet’s swinging arm suspension, which gave me a real edge.”

On his famous 350cc trials Bullet, registration number HNP 331, Johnny won the prestigious Scottish Six Days Trial twice, an arduous 900 mile contest spread over six long days, (1952 and 1957), the formidable Scott Trial twice (1955 and 1956), the tough British Experts Trial twice, where he was its youngest ever winner (1952 and 1953), and amassed over 50 major championship wins and a huge haul of open trial first places. Beginning with his first ISDT campaign on a Royal Enfield in the 1950 competition, Johnny accumulated 13 gold medals over 15 years, although some of those rides were on a 500 Twin and a 500 Bullet rather than HNP 331.

Johnny Brittain’s works trials Bullets of 1956 and 1957 were all conquering. In ’56, he triumphed in the ACU Star championship and his tally of wins included the Welsh Trophy, the Scott, Mitchell and Streatham trials, the Alan Hurst, Shropshire and Patland Cups as well as second places in the Scottish Six Days Trial and two other major events. The following year, he clocked up wins in the Scottish Six Days, Vic Brittain (named in honour of his father), Cleveland, Travers, Red Rose and Cotswold Trials amongst others.

To mark this tremendous run of results the firm released a Bullet closely based on his winning machine in 1958. Named the 350 Trials Works Replica, it aimed to give its rider a great starting point from which to compete in trials. Employing the same lighter, all-welded frame made of aircraft quality chrome-molybdenum, it sported a slimmed-down 21⁄2 gallon petrol tank, 21” front wheel, knobbly tyres, alloy mudguards, a sump guard, high-level exhaust, Lucas Wader magneto and a slimline gearbox with low gearing.

Even the engine was given the works treatment as its bottom end was formed around heavier 500cc Bullet flywheels, resulting in a motor which plonked like a gas engine, and its barrel was cast in aluminium alloy. Finished in polychromatic silver grey, the Trials Works Replica was a beauty to look at as well as to ride.Royal Enfield Bullet Trial

Johnny wasn’t Royal Enfield’s sole trials rider though. There was always a works team at major events which, over the years, included Johnny’s younger brother, Pat, as well as other leading lights of the trials circuit such as Tom Ellis, ‘Jolly’ Jack Stocker, Don Evans, Peter Fletcher, Peter Gaunt and Peter Stirland. Even Bill Lomas, long before he became a two- time motorcycle grand prix world champion, won a first class award on a Royal Enfield trials Bullet.

By the end of the 1950s, however, the days of the heavyweight trials motorcycle were numbered. Responding to the trend for ever lighter bikes, with revvier engines that could snap the front wheel up and over obstacles and make best use of the constantly improving tyre compounds and tread patterns, Royal Enfield refocused its trials ambitions around the new, unit-construction 250cc Crusader.

The story of Royal Enfield’s trials motorcycles doesn’t end with the 1967 Redditch factory closure. Over subsequent decades, many owners have undertaken trials conversions, using both British and Indian road Bullets as their starting point. Although the majority have standard gearing and see only occasional light greenlaning use, a significant number have been built to fully competitive specification and are regular entrants in classic trials events, including the celebrated Scottish Pre-65 Trial, a revered annual competition held in the highlands of Scotland ahead of the Scottish Six Days Trial.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Discount on first Tibet tours

Extreme Bike Tours is offering a 10% discount on its first tours of Tibet and Nepal, the Mt Everest base camp and the Forbidden City of Lhasa in 2020.

Riders will be aboard Royal Enfield Himalayan adventure motorcycles  which were tested in the Himalayas.

Royal Enfield Himalayan Sleet invests camo
Royal Enfield Himalayan

We toured Sri Lanka last year with Extreme Bike Tours and found them to be top value, professional and honest.

Company part-owner Ben Lloyd says there is already so much interest in their 15-day, 2277km tour that they have scheduled two tours next year from 5-20 September and 22 September to 6 October.

Their tours have a cap of 10 riders to keep them intimate and safe.

Prices are $US5895 (about $A8800) for riders, $US4950 ($A7350) for a pillion and $US695 ($A1000) for a single room.

If you book before the end of October 2019, they will take 10% off.

That’s good value as they stay in good quality hotels and all meals are included. In fact, everything but your flights, health insurance, alcohol and tips is included.

Tibet treasures

The tour starts in Kathmandu, Nepal, and climbs to 5220m to Mt Everest base camp and on to the spectacular Tibetan Plateau.

Tibet Lhasa
The Forbidden City of Lhasa

They even include free oxygen cylinders for those find the altitude hard going.

Despite the adventure, it’s still only rated at “intermediate” skill level, so there will be some rough riding involved.

Highlights of the tour include stunning mountain scenery, challenging roads, spectacular waterfalls, sacred caves, ancient monasteries and temples, and jaw-dropping views of Mt Everest from old Tingri if the weather is kind.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Ride away on classic motorcycles

If you are looking for some affordable, restored classics you can ride away, there are seven on the block at the upcoming Shannons Sydney Winter Auction on August 26 – most with ‘no reserve’.

The highlight for British motorcycle enthusiasts is a 1970 650cc Triumph Bonneville T120R (photo above), presented in restored condition and expected to sell in the $12,000-$16,000 range.

There are also two classic ‘intra-War’ BSA twin cylinder 500cc solos: ­a restored 1941 BSA WM20 and an unrestored, but complete 1946 M20. Each is expected to sell with ‘no reserve’ in the $7000-$10,000 range.

If you are looking for some affordable, restored classics you can ride away, there are seven on the block at the upcoming Shannons Sydney Winter Auction on August 26 – most with ‘no reserve’.
Unrestored 1943 BSA M20

As an alternative for British classic motorcycle enthusiasts, there is a single-cylinder, 125cc 1948 Royal Enfield ‘Flying Flea’ motorcycle. Presented in useable condition and offered with ‘no reserve’, it is expected to sell in the $4000-$6000 range.

If you are looking for some affordable, restored classics you can ride away, there are seven on the block at the upcoming Shannons Sydney Winter Auction on August 26 – most with ‘no reserve’.
Royal Enfield Flying Flea

There are two great Japanese 1980s dirt bikes: a 1980 80cc Suzuki RM80T and a mighty 600cc 1983 Honda XL600R –  both fresh from similar ground-up restorations and neither being used since completion.

If you are looking for some affordable, restored classics you can ride away, there are seven on the block at the upcoming Shannons Sydney Winter Auction on August 26 – most with ‘no reserve’.
Honda XL600R

Each is offered with ‘no reserve’, with the Suzuki expected to sell for $2000-$3000 and the Honda for $3000-$6000.

Japanese collectors may be interested in an unrestored example of Yamahas first road model – the 650cc XS-1. 

This original classic is in good rideable condition and expected to sell with ‘no reserve’ in the $9000-$13,000 range.

To view all Shannons August 26 Sydney Winter Auction lots, visit www.shannons.com.au

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Corbin seat for Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

Famous seat manufacturer Corbin has introduced a new seat to soften the hard ride of the new Royal Enfield Interceptor 650.

If the mark of a successful model is the number of aftermarket accessory companies that provide premium parts, Royal Enfield is on a winner with the new Interceptor and Continental GT 650.

Swedish premium suspension company Ohlins was the first with full suspension upgrades for the twins.

The FSK145 fork springs cost $A399 and the RE911 twin shocks are $A1129 or $A949 for the RE912.

They will be followed by full suspension for the 400cc Himalayan adventurer. Prices are expected to be $A399 for the FSK 144 forks and $A1395 for the RE 907 shocks.

American engine giant S&S Cycle has followed up with 750cc and 865cc big-bore kits, mufflers and various other parts for the twins. (See end of article for a full price list.)S&S Cycles big bore kit for Royal Enfield 650 camshaft-kit-royal-enfield-650

Corbin seatCorbin seat for Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

Now Corbin has joined the parts rush with a $US497 Gunfighter & Lady seat.

It is made with Comfort Cell foam and accepts an adjustable removable passenger backrest ($US257).Corbin seat for Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

A simple setscrew on the rear of the backrest sets the angle without removing it from the seat. Support hardware is built inside the seat to keep a clean look without external brackets.

There is also a small, plastic four-litre top box ($US393) available for the backrest to store wets, gloves, water, maps, etc.

S&S parts

Here is the full list of S&S performance parts for the new Royal twins.

Part

Price (USD)

Price (INR – For Representation only)

Dynojet Power Commander V with Calibration

USD399.99

INR27,760

High-Flow Air Intake Eliminator Plate Kit

USD23.95

INR1,662

High-Flow Replacement Air Filter

USD59.95

INR4,161

High-Compression 11:1 Piston Kit

USD492.95

INR34,211

Stainless Muffler Set

USD641.95

INR44,552

Race only Stainless Muffler Set

USD474.95

INR32,962

Handlebar Adjuster Kit (INT 650)

USD69.95

INR4,855

Performance Clutch Kit

USD399.95

INR27,757

High-Performance Camshaft Kit with Shims

USD186.95

INR12,975

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

S&S big-bore kits for Royal Enfield

Royal Enfield is on a winner with its 650cc twins as American engine giant S&S Cycle has now added 750cc and 865cc big-bore kits.

This follows the recent announcement that premium Swedish suspension manufacturer Ohlins has developed suspension grades for the twins and the Himalayan.

S&S also have other performance parts for the new Interceptor 650 and Continental GT 650.

They include clutch kits ($US399.95), mufflers ($US474.95) and handlebar adjuster kits ($US69.95).

But the biggest news is the 750cc big-bore kit at $US630.95 (about $A900) and 865cc kit ($US634.95).

S&S usually only make big-bore kits and performance gear for Harley-Davidson and Indian V-twins.

This is the first time the Wisconsin company has produced performance parts for any other specific motorcycle.

The company stress that the performance gear is for “closed-course competition use only”.

While they do not yet reveal power and torque output for the kits, they have released the following tech details.

750cc big-bore kit:

Stock

S&S 750 Kit

Bore X Stroke

78 x 67.8mm

83.5 x 67.8mm

Compression Ratio

9.5:1

11.0:1

865cc kit:

Stock

S&S 865 Kit

Bore X Stroke

78 x 67.8mm

90 x 67.8mm

Compression Ratio

9.5:1

11.0:1

The kits feature comprehensive engine upgrades including larger cylinders and pistons in addition to new head gasket.

Royal Enfield’s 648cc parallel twin produces 35kW (47hp) and 52Nm of torque. Output should increase about another 17kW to around 52kW.Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 arriving bore

Here is the full list of S&S performance parts for the new Royal twins.

Part

Price (USD)

Price (INR – For Representation only)

Dynojet Power Commander V with Calibration

USD399.99

INR27,760

High-Flow Air Intake Eliminator Plate Kit

USD23.95

INR1,662

High-Flow Replacement Air Filter

USD59.95

INR4,161

High-Compression 11:1 Piston Kit

USD492.95

INR34,211

Stainless Muffler Set

USD641.95

INR44,552

Race only Stainless Muffler Set

USD474.95

INR32,962

Handlebar Adjuster Kit (INT 650)

USD69.95

INR4,855

Performance Clutch Kit

USD399.95

INR27,757

High-Performance Camshaft Kit with Shims

USD186.95

INR12,975

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com