Tag Archives: Paton

The only C9/2 V70 Paton racer in existence

Paton C9/2 V70 Racer

With Phil Aynsley


Giuseppe Pattoni was the chief mechanic for the FB Mondial GP team when the company (together with Guzzi and Gilera) quit racing at the end of 1957. He and former company engineer, Lino Tonti, then formed their own company, Paton. Their first bike was a 125cc single, closely based on the Mondial.

PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer

Mike Hailwood finished seventh on the bike in the 1958 IOM Lightweight TT. This was followed by a 250cc parallel twin which in turn spawned 350 and 500cc versions. The 500 was the most successful and still produced for classic racing. Indeed it is the go-to bike for the 500 classes.

PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer

In 1975-76 Pattoni started development of a V4 two-stroke. It was the first single crankshaft V4 to appear in the 500 Championship. It was also the first design that Pattoni’s son Roberto was involved with. However it wasn’t until 1983 that the much refined C1 500 was ready for competition.

PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer

As with the original design the cylinder angle was 115º. It wasn’t until 1990 that it was changed to 90º. A redesign (the C9/2) in 1994 saw the angle further reduced to 70º. A pair of special magnesium Dell’Orto carburettors were fitted (each with two two intakes/float bowls per body) with Paton manufactured top fittings.

PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer

The 1995 C10/1 saw power rise to 165 hp, still at 12,000 rpm. This bike is the only ’94 spec V70 in existence as the second machine was upgraded to C10/1 specification. Output was 150 hp at 12,000 rpm, while dry weight was just 135 kg.

PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer PA Paton C V RacerPaton C9/2 V70 Racer

Source: MCNews.com.au

F. B. Mondial 250cc twin-cylinder GP Racer

F. B. Mondial / Paton 250 GP Racer

With Phil Aynsley


I have been fortunate enough to have photographed quite a few F. B. Mondials over the years and have been very impressed with their designs.

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

The 1958 F. B. Mondial / Paton 250 GP Racer Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial first experimented with siamesing two of their successful 125cc singles together

However all of their race bikes were singles – so I was intrigued, while browsing the net, to spot a photo of a collection in Italy that appeared to show a twin-cylinder Mondial GP bike.

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

The Mondial twin is an unusual machine from a brand renowned for their singles

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

After some research and emails I found myself near Milan to photograph what turned out to be a very interesting machine!

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

The 1958 F. B. Mondial / Paton 250 GP Racer Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

The first design in 1955 proved a non-starter but paved the way for further development

Mondial had a couple of attempts at making a twin-cylinder GP bike it turns out. In 1955 the company’s head engineer Alfonso Drusiani designed a 250 that was basically two of the successful 125 singles siamesed together on a common crankcase.

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Head engineer Alfonso Drusiani originally designed the 250

Unfortunately the result, while making a claimed 35 hp at 10,000 rpm, was both complex and overweight at 130 kg dry. Additionally the motor had a very narrow power band.

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

The early project was abandoned, however… it led to the bike pictured here Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

The 1958 F. B. Mondial / Paton 250 GP Racer

Two examples were constructed and while the project was abandoned after two years it was notable as being the first racing motorcycle to use a disc brake – a fully enclosed Campagnolo design.

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Count Boselli persevered with the idea however and a new twin was developed

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

The desire to race a twin did not leave Mondial’s owner Count Boselli however (competitors such as MV, Gilera and Ducati had all developed twins) so in 1957 Leo Tonti was commissioned to design and construct a 250cc twin to replace the company’s excellent single. It is this bike that can be seen here.

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Development at the time was spurred on by the success of competitors with their twin-cylinder offerings

Tonti involved Giuseppe Pattoni and the pair had the bike ready by the end of the following year – only for Mondial to join Guzzi and Gilera in quitting their involvement in GP racing!

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

The 1958 F. B. Mondial / Paton 250 GP Racer Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

The 1958 F. B. Mondial / Paton 250 GP Racer

Tonti and Pattoni then formed Paton and were able to campaign the factory’s old race bike for a time. The 250 twin made appearances at the Nations GP at Monza in ’58 and ’59 but did not progress any further.

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

Mondial Twin Paton ImagePA

The The 1958 F. B. Mondial 250 GP Racer would later be raced under the Paton name

The Bialbero (DOHC) two-valve motor made 35 hp and used a six-speed gearbox. Dry weight was 121 kg. In many respects the bike could be considered the first in the long line of Paton’s.

Source: MCNews.com.au

Paton PG 500 R V4 Racer

With Phil Aynsley


Giuseppe Pattoni was the chief mechanic for the FB Mondial GP team when the company (together with Guzzi and Gilera) quit racing at the end of 1957. He and former company engineer, Lino Tonti, then formed their own company, Paton.

Paton RG R PA PatonPGR
Paton PG 500 R V4 Racer

Their first bike was a 125cc single, closely based on the Mondial. Mike Hailwood finished seventh on the bike in the 1958 IOM Lightweight TT. This was followed by a 250cc parallel twin which in turn spawned 350 and 500cc versions.

Paton RG R PA PatonPGR
Paton PG 500 R V4 Racer

The 500 was the most successful and is still produced for classic racing, indeed it is generally considered the go-to bike for the 500 classes and many are still raced by high profile names at the Classic TT.

Paton RG R PA PatonPGR
Paton PG 500 R V4 Racer

In 1975-76 Pattoni started development of a V4 2-stroke. It was the first single crankshaft V4 to appear in the 500 Championship. It was also the first design that Pattoni’s son Roberto was involved with.

Paton RG R PA PatonPGR
Paton PG 500 R V4 Racer

However it wasn’t until 1983 that the much refined C1 500 was ready for competition. As with the original design the cylinder angle was 115º. It wasn’t until 1990 that it was changed to 90º.

Paton RG R PA PatonPGR
Paton PG 500 R V4 Racer

A redesign in 1994 saw the angle further reduced to 70º. A boost for the team came from a visit to the Paton workshop by Youichi Oguma, head of HRC.

Paton RG R PA PatonPGR
Paton PG 500 R V4 Racer

After being told of the difficulty in obtaining small enough carburettors to properly fit the engine architecture, Oguma arranged for a set of Keihin 36mm units, specifically developed for Honda’s NSR bikes, to be supplied to Pattoni.

Paton RG R PA PatonPGR
Paton PG 500 R V4 Racer

The new bike showed great promise at the beginning of 1995 but a crash by rider Jean Pierre Jeandat in the warm up for the British GP affected his results for the next two years.

Paton RG R PA PatonPGR
Paton PG 500 R V4 Racer

A further blow occurred at the start of the 1997 season when the Paton team was denied automatic entry to the Championship, ending 39 years of continuous competition by Pattoni. However he continued to develop the bike, entering occasional races as a ‘wild card’ team.

Paton RG R PA PatonPGR
Paton PG 500 R V4 Racer

Giuseppe Pattoni died of a heart attack after a test session in August 1999. His son continued work on the bike and presented the PG 500 R for the 2000 season. The frame was by the L.M. Gianetti firm and rider Paolo Tessari entered five races and scored Paton’s final point (and only point with a 2-stroke) with a 15th in the German GP. It is this bike I photographed.

Paton RG R PA PatonPGR
Paton PG 500 R V4 Racer

The metallic green paint was used for the first time as a tribute by Roberto to his father. Also used for the first time was a new motor design with 54x54mm cylinders. Output was 190hp at 12,100rpm. Weight 135kg.

Paton RG R PA PatonPGR
Paton PG 500 R V4 Racer

Although Paton’s final 2-stroke was the 2001 PG500 RC, which employed a 1994 Cagiva GP chassis, it was never able to compete in the Championship.

Paton RG R PA PatonPGR
Paton PG 500 R V4 Racer
Paton RG R PA PatonPGR
Paton PG 500 R V4 Racer

Paton RG R PA PatonPGR

Paton RG R PA PatonPGR
Paton PG 500 R V4 Racer

Source: MCNews.com.au