Tag Archives: Moto Guzzi V85 TT

Two Buddies Tour the Rocky Mountains

A Dream Come True - Two Buddies Tour the Rocky Mountains Moto Guzzi Spirit of the Eagle Rideaway V85 TT
Kit (on left), Guy, and the Moto Guzzi V85 TTs in Kanisku National Forest, ready to take on the resplendent Rocky Mountains. (Photos by Guy Pickrell)

“You’ve got to enter this!” said my touring mate, Marco, when he called me about Moto Guzzi’s Spirit of the Eagle Rideaway competition.

Describe your dream tour, anywhere in the USA. Win the use of a V85 TT adventure bike for 14 days and a $2,500 travel budget.

I threw down a route. Start in Seattle, ride east to Glacier National Park, then follow the Rocky Mountains south through Yellowstone, Grand Teton, Flaming Gorge, Capitol Reef, Grand Staircase-Escalante, and finish in Las Vegas. Eight days, seven states, six national parks and monuments, 2,600 miles. Epic!

Click here for the REVER route shown above

When the Piaggio Group called me last August to tell me I had won, it didn’t leave much time to prep and hit the road to beat the cold weather in Glacier National Park. My buddy Kit agreed to join me, and Moto Guzzi generously offered us a second bike. The adventure/dual-sport market isn’t Guzzi’s typical realm, so when I read that the TT stands for tutto terreno (all-terrain), I figured the least we could do is put them through a genuine off-road test. Part of the budget went toward Michelin Anakee Wild tires; billed as 50/50 on-/off-road, they have a surprisingly aggressive tread pattern. At 500-plus pounds, the V85 TT is no dirt bike, but if adventure is your goal, sooner or later you’re going to find yourself off the beaten path, and that’s exactly where we planned to be.

Our Chariots Await

We flew to Seattle and first saw our V85 TTs parked outside at Optimum Performance Motorsports. Their styling reminded me of old Paris-Dakar bikes. I took the Adventure edition, sporty in bright red and white livery, with only a gesture of a windscreen. Kit took the Travel edition, with a sophisticated metallic sand color and a larger windscreen, auxiliary lights and heated grips. Both bikes were fitted with excellent panniers, and the Adventure also included a top box, which I removed to allow more room for my DrySpec soft bags. After a chat with Alan Kwang, the dealership owner, he handed us the keys and wished us well. It was surreal riding away on brand new bikes without having exchanged anything more than a conversation.

A Dash Across an Apocalyptic Plain

It was nearly noon by the time we packed everything on the bikes and rode east out of Seattle. U.S. Route 2 climbs into rugged, pine-strewn mountains and goes over Stevens Pass (4,061 feet) before descending along the floor of a dramatic, glacial valley. During a late lunch in Leavenworth, the smell of smoke reminded us there were wildfires still burning across Washington State. After crossing the Columbia River, a steep ascent took us out of the rocky canyon onto a vast, windswept plain. Rolling grassland swept off to the horizon in all directions. Huge areas, scorched black by the recent flames, were still smoldering. It was like riding through the wake of a recent battle. We raced across the plateau for 140 miles, and then descended into Spokane and made quick time to our hotel in Ponderay, Idaho.

Two Buddies, Two Bikes, One Big Adventure
Going-to-the-Sun Road provides panoramic views of the dramatic arêtes, cascading valleys and ribbon lakes that make up Glacier National Park.

Majestic Glacier National Park and Deer in the Headlights

Still refining the bike-packing process, we began the first of 440 miles much later than planned. Just shy of the Canadian border, Route 2 turns east near Bonners Ferry, into the dense fir and spruce forests of Montana. Entering Glacier National Park, crystal-clear Lake McDonald sweeps up the valley alongside Going-to-the-Sun Road, a narrow strip of asphalt (and an engineering marvel) carved into the side of a mountain range. Logan Pass (6,647 feet) offered awesome views, as sheer valleys tumbled down to the lakes below and knife-edged arêtes towered above us. The light was fading by the time we got on the deserted forest road to Missoula. Kit spotted a mule deer, her almond eyes reflecting brightly in the Travel’s auxiliary lights. She was the first of many, and it was 10 p.m. when we finally walked into the Missoula Club bar, famous for its burgers and beer.

The Glorious Mountain Roads of Montana

After refueling in Hamilton, we turned east into the Sapphire Mountains on a steep gravel track and climbed up to Skalkaho Pass (7,257 feet). It was our first off-road test for the bikes and tires, and we quickly found our confidence on the hard-packed gravel. Abundant torque served us well, especially in 2nd and 3rd gears. By afternoon, the towering canyons had relented to reveal panoramic views of the dramatic scenery. We swept up another pass, riding into Virginia City, a marvelous authentic gold-rush town established in 1863. Following the Madison River south from Ennis, we had a breathtaking sight as the setting sun lit up a colossal rift running along the western bank. Eventually, we made it to our hotel in the dark, tired and hungry, only to discover the nearest restaurant was eight miles away, in West Yellowstone.

Two Buddies, Two Bikes, One Big Adventure
Clouds of sulphur-smelling steam billow up from boiling pools along the road through Yellowstone.

Enchanting Yellowstone and Towering Grand Teton

As the sun came up, we brushed the ice off our seats and rode into Wyoming and Yellowstone National Park. We rode a clockwise loop around the park, passing steaming geysers, volcanic hot springs that belched scorching, sulfurous gas, and bison that grazed the roadside meadows, eventually coming upon enormous Yellowstone Lake. We made a quick stop at the amazing Old Faithful Inn, just as its namesake geyser erupted.

Two Buddies, Two Bikes, One Big Adventure
The Tetons looming over Jackson Lake

The road exiting Yellowstone’s southern entrance runs along the edge of a sheer canyon, ending at Jackson Lake, where the Tetons, a series of three spectacular peaks, soar up from the western bank to over 13,500 feet like giant fossilized teeth. It was late afternoon when we stopped at Alpine to buy supplies. The Guzzis always drew a small crowd and a flurry of questions. I discovered our next leg, a 95-mile dirt track through Bridger-Teton National Forest, was only graded for the first 40. Undeterred (somewhat), we proceeded anyway and soon found an idyllic spot to make camp by the river.

Scarlet Sockeye and the Stunning Beauty of Flaming Gorge

After a chilly, restless night, we rejoined the track running along Greys River, a ribbon of blue and lush green framed by rocky bluffs. As predicted, the track became steep and challenging, but the V85 TTs’ suspension capably soaked up the abuse, while their V-twins churned out torque with a lovely, distinctive rumble. We savored awesome view after awesome view as our fifth day’s route took us out of Wyoming’s forested mountains and into the painted desert canyons of Utah.

Two Buddies, Two Bikes, One Big Adventure
Steaming in the early chill, bucolic Madison River flows into Yellowstone National Park

Desolate plateau roads delivered us to a series of tight corners cut into the red rock, descending hundreds of feet into Flaming Gorge. At the bottom, we stopped at Sheep Creek, where the shallow, limpid water was teeming with sockeye salmon. A series of thrilling sweepers and twisties climbed out of the gorge, providing a spectacular view of the sheer, banded cliffs of crimson and terracotta strata and the reservoir below. The plateau finally ended with a dramatic zig-zagging 3,000-foot descent to the town of Vernal, Utah. We used every electrical socket in the room to charge the crap out of everything — cameras, phones, drone — making the most of our last night in a hotel.

Ridge Riding on Top of the World and A Steer Standoff

After a dash across the vast Uinta Basin, we descended into Scofield (pop. 23), home to Snack & Pack, a quirky gas station where customers broil their own burgers. With us and the Guzzis refueled, we climbed into the mighty Manti-La Sal Mountains and onto Skyline Drive Scenic Backway, a rough unpaved road that follows a knife-edged ridge at over 10,000 feet, with sheer drops down both sides to the valleys below. I tried to focus on the riding, despite the arresting views at every turn. This was not a good place to screw up.

Two Buddies, Two Bikes, One Big Adventure
Skyline Drive can test the nerves, but at 10,000 feet the views are worth the effort

With one eye on the clock, we reluctantly turned off Skyline, riding down into the valley, where we found our route blocked by a herd of belligerent bovine. Stores are scarce in this remote part of Utah, and we were forced to ride 20 miles past our exit to buy supplies, starting the last leg as the sun began to set — a steep, 18-mile dirt track that provided plenty of butt-clenching moments in the dusk. We pitched our tents on patches of sand among boulders and stunted juniper. There was no moon, and when the last of the firewood burnt out, we could see the Milky Way painted across the night sky, with shades of purple, blue and red in an ocean of stars.

We Max Out the V85 TTs and Reluctantly Ride to Vegas

The morning sun blazed across the desert as we tore off down the rocky trail and into Cathedral Valley, where a group of distinctive striped mesas rise up from the plain like a village hewn from rock. Capitol Reef National Park is amazingly varied. Terracotta cliffs are the backdrop to white and yellow hoodoos, vivid green yuccas and gnarly juniper, as well as a formidable mix of sand-and-rubble tracks. Our pace had increased, and at times we asked more from the Guzzis than they were designed for, but what a ride! Inevitably, a deep sandy section proved too much of an ask, and I dumped my Adventure — scuza amore.

Two Buddies, Two Bikes, One Big Adventure
The Milky Way, spanning the sky on a moonless night at our camp in Capitol Reef National Park’s Cathedral Valley

As we neared its end, the trail entered a dense line of trees and abruptly ended at the Fremont River. The fast running water was muddy, and Kit was the first to ford with little notion of depth and no idea what lay below. A breathtaking narrow road perched atop a meandering ridge separated by two yawning canyons delivered us to Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Completely exhausted, we began looking for a campsite along Cottonwood Canyon Road. I found a ledge with a panoramic view across the valley. A series of sheer, striped ridges ran across the horizon, and towering above these, the giant mesa we had traversed all afternoon. We toasted our last night as the last of the sun’s rays set alight Escalante’s vivid strata. It had all gone so fast, and yet Seattle seemed like a lifetime ago. The view from my tent the following morning was worthy of its own trip.

Two Buddies, Two Bikes, One Big Adventure
Our last campsite, overlooking a majestic valley in Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, was in itself worthy of riding 2,600 miles

On our final day, we thundered down a deserted, undulating track running along the floor of Cottonwood Canyon, a dust cloud in our wake and rocks pinging off the sump guards. With the road through Zion National Park closed, we had to take a southern loop through Arizona before starting the last, searing leg down to Las Vegas.

The Moto Guzzi V85 TT, È Tutto Terreno?

After riding hundreds of miles on dirt tracks, some seriously challenging, the V85 TT has convinced this skeptic that it will handle anything you can reasonably expect to throw at it. Overall build quality is excellent. Even with its handsomely sculpted 5.6-gallon tank full of gas, the V85’s center of gravity feels surprisingly low, and coupled with the Michelin Anakee Wild tires, inspired the kind of off-road confidence usually associated with lighter bikes. On the road, more midrange power would make fast overtaking maneuvers less of an exercise in physics, but otherwise, the V85 TT was a superb ride.

Two Buddies, Two Bikes, One Big Adventure
A new day in Cathedral Valley, and the most challenging terrain yet

Both Kit and I are over six feet tall, and I’d figured we’d be folded up like a couple of deckchairs, but with some huge miles undertaken, we appreciated the excellent ergonomics and supremely comfortable seat. In terms of range, comfort, durability and handling on- and off-road, the V85 TT is a credible contender at a competitive price, and the folks in Mandello del Lario deserve credit for also making it so very beautiful. We were reluctant to hand back the keys. Arrivederci bellissima! Thanks for the good times!

Two Buddies, Two Bikes, One Big Adventure
Thundering down the deserted Cottonwood Canyon Road in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

The post Two Buddies Tour the Rocky Mountains first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

‘A Dream Come True’ Video

A Dream Come True: Moto Guzzi V85 TT Spirit of the Eagle Rideaway Adventure
Kit (on left), Guy, and the Moto Guzzi V85 TTs in Kaniksku National Forest.

In 2020, Guy Pickrell won the Moto Guzzi “Spirit of the Eagle Rideaway” competition. He dreamed up an epic 2,600-mile, 8-day, 7-state, 6-national-park adventure route.

Moto Guzzi gave Guy and his buddy Kit Klein use of two Moto Guzzi V85 TT adventure bikes and a $2,500 travel budget. They packed their gear, had Michelin Anakee Wild tires mounted on the bikes, and they hit the road.

Starting in Seattle, they rode east to Glacier National Park, south to Yellowstone, Grand Teton, Flaming Gorge, Capitol Reef, and Grand Staircase-Escalante, and they finished in Las Vegas. Their route included paved sections like Going-to-the-Sun Road in Montana and unpaved tracks like Skyline Drive Scenic Backway in Utah.

Two buddies, two bikes, one big adventure. This is their story.

To find a Moto Guzzi dealer near you, visit motoguzzi.com.

The post ‘A Dream Come True’ Video first appeared on Rider Magazine.
Source: RiderMagazine.com

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel announced

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel


For 2020 the Moto Guzzi V85 TT receives a new version, called the ‘Travel’, offering a range of standard fitment accessories specifically chosen to offer the ideal adventure-touring kit-out, straight off the showroom floor. Limited numbers have been confirmed to be arriving in Australia in mid-2020, with pricing to be announced closer to release date.

Moto Guzzi V TT Travel
2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel

The V85 TT Travel will feature a higher touring windshield offers increased rider protection for long distance hauls, with 60% more surface area than the standard screen.

Two lightweight durable plastic panniers are also included, with a 37L capacity on the right case and with 27.5L on the left, with matched keys and room for a full face helmet in the larger pannier.

Heated grips are another standard inclusion, ensuring cool weather doesn’t take the shine out of riding, with control via the left switchblock, keeping everything well integrated.

Moto Guzzi V TT Travel
2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel

Additional LED lights are also fitted, with the V85 TT Travel also feature the Moto Guzzi MIA multimedia platform that allows smartphone syncing.

The Travel also features an exclusive Sabbia Namib colour scheme, including dedicated graphics.

Michelin Anakee Adventure tyres are also in line with the V85 TT Travel’s adventure-touring theme, run on the 2.50 x 19inch front and 4.25 x 17inch rear spoked wheels.

Moto Guzzi V TT Travel
2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel

The V85 TT features an air-cooled tranverse 90° V-twin, with two valves per cylinder and a capacity of 853cc. The final drive is a fully enclosed shaft drive transmission keeping maintenance to a minimum, with a 23L tank offering a large range in excess of 400km.

Compression is run at 10.5:1 with a bore and stroke of 84 by 77mm, while peak power is 80 hp at 7750 rpm, while max torque is reached at 5000rpm and is 80 Nm. Fuelling is delivered via a 52mm throttle body with Ride-by-Wire, alongside a modern electronic package offering Riding Modes and MGCT traction control, as well as ABS.

Moto Guzzi V TT Travel
2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel

The chassis consists of a high-strength steel tubular frame, 41mm USD forks with preload and rebound adjustability and a single shock with preload and rebound adjustability connected to the box-type double-sided swingarm. Travel is 170mm at each end.

Brakes consist of 320mm rotors with Brembo radial-mount four-piston calipers on the front, and a 260mm rear rotor with two-piston caliper.

Moto Guzzi V TT Travel
2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel

Australian arrival is expected in mid-2020 with limited numbers available, while pricing is yet to be released, so keep an eye out for an update.

The standard Moto Guzzi V85 TT is currently available in Australia for $20,690 Ride-Away for the uni-colour options, or for $21,390 Ride-Away for the Evocative option. For more information see the Australian Moto Guzzi website: http://www.motoguzzi.com/au_EN

2020 Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel Specifications

SPECIFICATIONS
ENGINE
Type Transverse 90° V twin, two valves per cylinder (titanium intake).
Cooling Air
Capacity 853 cm³
Bore x stroke 84 x 77 mm
Compression  10.5: 1
Max power 80 HP (59 kW) at 7,750 rpm
Torque 80 Nm at 5,000 rpm
Fuel system Electronic injection; Ø 52 mm single throttle body, Ride-by-Wire
Fuel capacity 23 litres (including 5 litre reserve)
Emissions  Euro 4
Consumption  4.9 l/100 km
CO2 Emissions 118 g/km
TRANSMISSION
Clutch Dry single disc
Transmission 6 gears
CHASSIS
Frame High strength steel tubular frame
Front Sus. 41 mm hydraulic telescopic USD fork, with adjustable spring preload and hydraulic rebound
Front travel 170 mm
Rear Sus. Double-sided swingarm in box-type aluminium with a single shock on the right side, with adjustable spring preload and hydraulic rebound
Rear travel 170 mm
Front brake Double 320 mm stainless steel floating discs, Brembo radial-mounted callipers with 4 opposed pistons
Rear brake Ø 260 mm stainless steel disc, floating calliper with 2 pistons
Wheels Spoked
Front rim 2.50″ x 19″
Rear rim 4.25″ x 17″
Front tyre With air chamber 110/80 – R19″
Rear tyre With air chamber 150/70 – R17″
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
A/C Gen. 430 W
Sys. voltage 12 V
Battery 12V – 12 Ah

Source: MCNews.com.au

Moto Guzzi Open House celebrates Guzzisti

Moto Guzzi Open House 2019


30,000 motorcycle fans from all over Europe celebrated the classic Moto Guzzi Open House event from Friday 6 September through Sunday 8 September, with the Mandello Moto Guzzi plant peacefully invaded by bikers and enthusiasts, families and convoys of friends.

Moto Guzzi Open House
2019 Moto Guzzi Open House

All in Mandello to celebrate one of the most noble brands of motorcycling, one of the most famous and beloved Italian brands. The three days were filled with love for bikes, friendship, music, travel, adventure and lots of test rides.

As always, the central moment of the Mandello celebration was Saturday, the day when record attendance on a single day was recorded – 20,000 – and the day that began with the arrival of the “Road to Mandello” convoy, consisting of more than two hundred Guzzisti who had left from Milan to reach the legendary red gates on Via Parodi, the symbol of Moto Guzzi.

Moto Guzzi Open House Gate
2019 Moto Guzzi Open House

The protagonist of the 2019 edition was the Moto Guzzi V85 TT, the all-terrain bike which, after being introduced during this year, is already the brand’s best-seller and one of the most admired bikes this season.

The V7 III was one of the bikes most in demand for test rides and also one of the stars, since in 2019 the first edition of the Moto Guzzi Fast Endurance is being raced, the trophy that places the appropriately outfitted, lightweight, 750cc twin-cylinder on the track.

Moto Guzzi Open House visita linea assemblaggio
2019 Moto Guzzi Open House

The bikes participating in the Trophy attracted admiring looks from many visitors, while the Fast Endurance riders and teams were in Mandello ahead of the final race which will be held in Misano on 13 October.

Thanks to the partnership with Virgin Radio, the Moto Guzzi Village, set up in the centre of the plant, was the nerve centre of the festival. Special guests were hosted by DJ Ringo on the stage, talking about races, trips and adventures. The test rides departed from the Village, giving more than 400 bikers the chance to test all the models in the Moto Guzzi family on the splendid roads surrounding Lake Como.

Moto Guzzi Open House Shop
2019 Moto Guzzi Open House

The Moto Guzzi Museum, which houses and preserves more than 150 historic models, beginning with the ’50s era racing bikes, including the legendary 8-cylinder 500, was just one of the attractions, as was the wind tunnel, while the assembly lines were invaded by visitors from Friday.

The Moto Guzzi plant in Mandello confirmed its status as a symbolic location in motoring history, one of the most famous in the world. Since 1921, the year it was founded, Moto Guzzis have been manufactured non-stop here. It is a site rich in history that has accompanied Italian industrial development and the global affirmation of the Eagle Brand.

Moto Guzzi Open House
2019 Moto Guzzi Open House

Legendary models such as the Falcone, the Galletto, the V7 range, the Le Mans and Imola sport bikes have come from here, all the way up to the modern, brand new and technologically advanced V7 III, V9, V85 TT models and the California 1400 family.

It is here that the competition Moto Guzzis were born, dominating the glory years of motorcycling and winning 15 championship titles (eight rider and seven manufacturer) in Grand Prix Motorcycle Racing.

Source: MCNews.com.au