Tag Archives: learner rider

Will Aprilia RS 660 suit learners?

Aprilia plan to introduce a lower-powered version of its upcoming RS 660 lightweight sports bike so it can be ridden by learners and novices under the European A2 motorcycle licence.

The announcement came in a quirky Instagram post that says “A2 driving license? Aprilia RS 660 95hp version confirmed! Keep updated!”Aprilia RS 660 learner bike?

The A2 licence is a similar system to the Australian and New Zealand Learner Approved Motorcycle System, so there could be scope to also make a LAMS version alongside the fuel-powered version.

This has been done with several other bikes on the market, notably the Yamaha MT-07LA which has reduced capacity (from 689cc to 655cc) and restricted power (from 55kW to 38kW) via 25% throttler restriction, different cams and pistons.

Yamaha MT-07 missing stickerYamaha MT-07LA

The lithe Aprilia RS 660 weighs in at 169kg dry and fits in the 660cc or below capacity limits of LAMS.

However, they would have to do a fair bit more power restriction on the 95hp (70kW) bike to fit the scheme which also has a power-to-weight formula of 150 kilowatts per tonne or less.

Aprilia RS 660

Aprilia RS 660 lightweightAprilia RS 660

The Aprilia RS 660 was unveiled at the EICMA show in November 2019.

Aprilia sees the bike as having wide appeal, even as an everyday commuter.

In fact, its five riding modes spell it out: Commute, Dynamic, Individual (we imagine that’s a customisable mode), Challenge and Time Attack.

It has adjustable Kayaba suspension, a double aero fairing and smartphone connectivity with navigation display on the instruments.

The bike is expected to arrive in the latter half of the year with prices and full tech specs announced closer to that time.

2021 Aprilia Tuono 660 concept2021 Aprilia Tuono 660 concept

It will be followed in 2021 by a Tuono naked version like the concept presented at EICMA which is slightly downtuned at 96hp (71kW).

There is also expected to be a restricted version for Europe that may also come in under Australia’s LAMS rules for novice riders.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

CFMoto 650GT ‘worth the extra dollars’

Motorcycle industry stalwart Dale Schmidtchen has been reviewing the CFMoto 650MT for some time now, but recently switched to the road touring 650GT version.

While the CFMoto 650 MT ABS costs $7490 ride away, the 650GT is an extra $1000. Both are learner-approved, but would also suit mature riders.

Dale says the GT is a “great bike” with “world-class” fit and finish that makes it well worth the extra money.

“If it had another name on the tank, you could easily believe it came from one of the best manufacturers,” he says.

“The only part of the bike that appears cheap are the switchblocks which need a better choice of symbols and fonts.”

Here is Dale’s assessment of the CFMoto 650GT:

Engine

At 100km/h, the engine is running at 4000rpm which is 500rpm less than the MT.

I get about a very reasonable 4.3L/100km from the MT, so the GT’s economy should be a little better.

At highway speed, power delivery is good and it doesn’t feel like it is over-geared.  In fact, it feels a little stronger in the mid-range than the MT.

Engine temperature shows it runs cooler than the MT which does tend to run hot in traffic.

It also feels cooler but this can be difficult to quantify as the temperature gauge does not indicate the actual temperature, only an LCD line.

SuspensionCFMoto 650GT

I would rate the GT’s suspension as the best of any CFMoto I’ve ridden.

It handles all manner of road bumps with ease and in general gives no cause for concern.

I would encourage CFMoto to add a preload adjuster cap to the fork, as these not only look good but offer a positive feature at little extra cost.

An Ohlins cap, spacer and spring kit costs the manufacturer very little and a lesser brand cap would add little to the bike’s overall cost, but more to its value.

The rear coloured spring is an attractive feature, but it would be great if it could be adjusted.

I would like to see a pin-type adjuster as used by Ohlins which is easy and simple to use.

Wheels, tyres and brakesCFMoto 650GT

The German Metzeler tyres are a noticeable improvement over the Chinese CST Adrenos fitted to the MT.

They add stability under braking, cornering integrity, they cope better with bumps and undulations and they have better grip. I would imagine they would have superior wet too, but it hasn’t rained here for a while!

The 160 section rear sat on the 4.5-inch rim better than the MT, as well.

Braking power started out a bit poor but began to offer good bite and progression after about 800km.

If they have used the same compounds as the MT, it will be best around 2000km.

Features

The riding position on the 650GT is good and suits a wider range of people with a lower seat than the MT.

I note that some effort has been used to weight the footpegs and rubber mount them.

The left footpeg was in the way most times when I put the side stand down.

By the way, as a tourer, it needs a centre stand, especially with the left-hand side chain run, making chain lubing more difficult on the side stand alone. 

The 650GT windscreen is perfect and the type of adjustment should be employed on the MT as it is more effective. Perhaps the robust MT system works better on rougher roads.

The fuel filler cap is much better than the MT as it stays in place during filling.

Mirrors are not as good as the MT as they vibrate. They need better weighting to reduce harmonics. Field of view is poor and there is not enough adjustment available.

Digital instrumentation are what you would expect on a more expensive bike with two layouts. I also love the way they change to night settings and are dimmable.

There is also a USB for charging your phone or GPS, which is essential for a tourer.

My only complaints are minor:

  • Like the MT, it needs a helmet lock;
  • It is difficult to tell the fuel and temperature gauges apart;
  • It was too easy to confuse the horn with the change button for the maps/dash layout; and
  • The rear axle nut is probably the biggest in the business and could do with at least 1cm shaved off.

Conclusion

This is a recommended option for anyone looking for a good-value, midsize road bike.

They should fit these with panniers from standard not only to fill in the rear aesthetically, but to truly live up to the “Grand Tourer” moniker.CFMoto 650GT

CFMoto 650GT tech specs

Engine

Engine Type: Two cylinder, inline 4-stroke, 8-valve, DOHC with counter balance
Capacity: 649.3cc
Bore & Stroke: 83mm x 60mm
Compression Ratio: 11.3:1
Fuel System: Bosch EFI
Max Power Output: 41.5 kW @ 9,500rpm (LAMS Restricted)
Max Torque: 62 NM @ 7,000rpm
Gearbox: 6-speed
Clutch: Multiplate wet

Chassis

Frame: Tubular steel diamond frame employing engine as fully-stressed member
Front Suspension: 38mm KYB telescopic fork (max travel 120mm)
Rear Suspension: Extruded steel swingarm with tubular steel bracing, cantilever KYB monoshock (max. travel 45mm)
Front Brake: J.Juan Dual 300mm discs with twin-piston calipers
Rear Brake: J.Juan Single 240mm disc with single-piston caliper
ABS: Continental ABS

Size / Weight

Length x Width x Height: 2100mm x 784mm x 1340mm
Wheelbase: 1415mm
Seat Height: 795mm
Min Ground Clearance: 150mm
Min Turning Diameter: 5.6m
Fuel Capacity: 19L
Payload: 150kg
Weight: 226kg

Wheels

Wheels Front: 17 x 3.5 cast alloy wheels
Wheels Rear: 17 x 4.5 cast alloy wheels
Tyres Front: 120/70 ZR17 Metzeler
Tyres Rear: 160/60 ZR17 Metzeler

Other

Available Colours: Concept Blue or Nebula Black
Warranty: 2 Year, Unlimited KM

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Learners cop demerit over hi-vis vests

Learner riders in Victoria will cop one demerit point for not wearing a hi-vis vest from tomorrow (29 October 2019) under new road rules.

The Victorian Motorcycle Council had called to remove mandatory hi-vis vests for learner riders in its 10-page submission to the review of Victorian Road Safety (Driver) Regulations.

However, it has been ignored.

Learner riders had previously only been fined for the offence.

Now they cop a demerit point for not wearing an approved hi-vis vest or jacket.

They will also now get three demerit points for riding without a “supervising driver (sic) sitting on  the seat beside (sic) them” and one demerit point for not displaying an L plate.

Vest of shame

Ipswich Bike Nights John Eacott support sentence Returned riders safety risk is a furphy time limit
John Eacott chooses to wear high-visibility gear but says it should not be compulsory

VMC media spokesman John Eacott says the rider learner permit changes are “unwarranted” and not a safety issue.

“The application of a requirement to have the Vest of Shame (aka the hi-vis safety vest) ‘securely fastened’ becomes a safety issue on hot days as it leads to heat stress and reduced rider competence,” he says.  

“This was highlighted shortly before the RIS when the Minister for Roads and Road Safety was shown the testing procedures at Deakin University of garments for MotoCAP.

“It is bizarre to have a requirement for a hi-vis vest for Learners and then demand it be worn in a manner to reduce rider efficiency. This was brought to the attention of the Department of Transport, but appears to have been ignored and not even mentioned in the summary of responses.”

We asked the Department of Transport for the number fines issued since the rule applied in 2014 and what consituted an approved vest/jacket.

No reply has yet been received but we will update if/when they do.

L plate demerit pointLearn learner novice Ride to Review plate demerit

The VMC also claim the L plate demerit point is unfair as a plate can easily fall off a motorcycle resulting in a rider losing their licence and their only mode of transport.

“There is no road safety risk or road user behaviour targeted by the sanction, therefore no genuine road safety objective served,” their submissions says.

“A motorcycle is an arduous exposed environment, experiencing vibration, winds, rain, road grime/fumes and sunlight/UV exposure.

“L plates are typically plastic, embrittle with time and are not very resilient to these exposed service conditions.

“As a result, an L-plate may fall off during a ride without the knowledge of the rider since plates are affixed to the rear of the motorcycle.”

Hi-vis mandated

The learner hi-vis rule was introduced in 2014 despite the state government’s road safety committee citing a European road safety research that found the benefits of wearing a high-visibility vest depended on the time of day and location.

Since its introduction, there has been no study into its effect on crashes among learners and the Traffic Accident Commission does not differentiate learner riders in its statistics. 

South Australia is now proposing hi-vis vests for learner riders as well as a night curfew and higher ages for learner permits.

We could not find any similar hi-vis rules throughout the world except France where all riders must have a minimum fluoro requirement on their jackets.

All riders (and drivers) in France must also carry a hi-vis vest and wear it if broken down on the side of the roads.

Most motorcycle police around the world wear hi-vis gear.

Victoria Solo Unit motorcycle police uniforms remove demerit
Victoria Solo Unit motorcycle police uniforms

However, it didn’t stop this British copper from nearly being hit by a van driver who just didn’t look even though the police officer had hi-vis gear, flashing lights and sirens.

Contrary evidence

University of Melbourne Chair of Statistics and bike rider Prof Richard Huggins has called to remove the rule since it was introduced.

The Prof has reviewed several international studies on motorcycle conspicuity and “look but fail to see” accidents and says there is “sufficient doubt” of the effectiveness of hi-vis to call for a repeal of the mandatory requirement.

He says the studies had varied findings suggesting:

  • Dark clothing is more visible in certain lighting situations;
  • Hi-vis rider gear may be less visible in certain conditions; and
  • Hi-vis clothing could create a “target fixation” for motorists, causing them to steer toward the wearer.

Richard also says he regularly wears a hi-visibility jacket when riding, but has still been hit by a car.

“The driver claimed they didn’t see me, from a distance of less than 2m, as they changed lanes on top of me,” he says.

When the law was introduced, the VMC cited Prof Huggins’s research and objected to the rule on several grounds:

  • Wearing hi-vis clothing may impart a false sense of security for novice riders;
  • Modern research shows that people don’t recognise or react to motorcycles, rather than not seeing them at all;
  • Drivers are more likely to see a bike but make an error in timing;
  • All bikes have hard-wired headlights yet no research has been done on how this affects hi-visibility; and
  • If hi-vis is a real safety issue, why are there no greater penalties for drivers who crash into people wearing them?

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Call to remove mandatory learner hi-vis

The Victorian Motorcycle Council has called to remove mandatory hi-vis vests for learner riders in its 10-page submission to the review of Victorian Road Safety (Driver) Regulations.

Among many changes to the road rules, the road regs review proposes one demerit point for learner riders who do not wear a “securely fastened” hi-vis vest and for failing to display an L plate.

The VMC say there is no proven road safety benefit in either proposal and claim the decreased air flow from a securely fastened vest “could cause accelerated fatigue and heat stress”.

Hi-vis mandated

The learner hi-vis rule was introduced in 2014 despite the state government’s road safety committee citing a European road safety research that found the benefits of wearing a high-visibility vest depended on the time of day and location.

Since its introduction, there has been no study into its effect on crashes among learners and the Traffic Accident Commission does not differentiate learner riders in its statistics. 

South Australia is now proposing hi-vis vests for learner riders as well as a night curfew and higher ages for learner permits.

We could not find any similar hi-vis rules throughout the world except France where all riders must have a minimum fluoro requirement on their jackets.

All riders (and drivers) in France must also carry a hi-vis vest and wear it if broken down on the side of the roads.

Most motorcycle police around the world wear hi-vis gear.

Victoria Solo Unit motorcycle police uniforms remove
Victoria Solo Unit motorcycle police uniforms

However, it didn’t stop this British copper from being hit by a driver who just didn’t look.

Contrary evidence

University of Melbourne Chair of Statistics and bike rider Prof Richard Huggins has called to remove the rule since it was introduced.

The Prof has reviewed several international studies on motorcycle conspicuity and “look but fail to see” accidents and says there is “sufficient doubt” of the effectiveness of hi-vis to call for a repeal of the mandatory requirement.

He says the studies had varied findings suggesting:

  • Dark clothing is more visible in certain lighting situations;
  • Hi-vis rider gear may be less visible in certain conditions; and
  • Hi-vis clothing could create a “target fixation” for motorists, causing them to steer toward the wearer.

Richard also says he regularly wears a hi-visibility jacket when riding, but has still been hit by a car.

“The driver claimed they didn’t see me, from a distance of less than 2m, as they changed lanes on top of me,” he says.

When the law was introduced, the VMC cited Prof Huggins’s research and objected to the rule on several grounds:

  • Wearing hi-vis clothing may impart a false sense of security for novice riders;
  • Modern research shows that people don’t recognise or react to motorcycles, rather than not seeing them at all;
  • Drivers are more likely to see a bike but make an error in timing;
  • All bikes have hard-wired headlights yet no research has been done on how this affects hi-visibility; and
  • If hi-vis is a real safety issue, why are there no greater penalties for drivers who crash into people wearing them?

Remove L plate proposalLearn learner novice Ride to Review plate remove

The Road Safety Regulations paper also proposes one demerit point for failing to correctly display an L plate.

The VMC has called to remove the proposal, saying it is not a safety issue.

They say a plate can easily fall off a motorcycle resulting in a rider losing their licence and their only mode of transport.

“There is no road safety risk or road user behaviour targeted by the sanction, therefore no genuine road safety objective served,” their submissions says.

“A motorcycle is an arduous exposed environment, experiencing vibration, winds, rain, road grime/fumes and sunlight/UV exposure.

“L plates are typically plastic, embrittle with time and are not very resilient to these exposed service conditions.

“As a result, an L-plate may fall off during a ride without the knowledge of the rider since plates are affixed to the rear of the motorcycle.”

Click here to read the full VMC submission.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Panic over hi-vis vest proposal

An incorrect News Ltd media report that Victoria proposes introducing hi-vis for all riders has caused some level of social media panic in the riding community.

Riders have been sharing the inaccurate reports which were lifted from the “Road Safety Regulations 2019 summary paper for consultation”.

So, for a start, it’s only a proposal at this stage.

The sentence lifted out of context is “Driving a motorcycle without a securely fitted and fastened high visibility vest of jacket”.

It is under a section that suggests introducing demerit points for the offence.

Learner riders have been required to wear hi-vis vests in Victoria from some years now. The proposal only adds a demerit point.high visibility motorcycle clothing panic

Panic stations

The erroneous News Ltd articles have been shared on social media causing panic among Victorian and interstate riders amid threats to protest.

Victorian Motorcycle Exports Advisory Panel member Dean Marks says there was a similar social media response when hi-vis for learners was proposed.

However, he points out that “the riding community sat on their collective thumbs” and only a small number turned out at a rally against the changes.

Dean blames infighting among “fractured” rider representative groups in the state for the apathy.

While the Victorian Government is not proposing hi-vis for all riders, many consider it may be on the agenda in future.

In 2015, France introduced a rule where riders have to carry a hi-vis vest to wear during a breakdown.

Meanwhile, the South Australian Government is considering following Victoria with hi-vis for novice riders.

This is despite the road toll in Victoria rising in the past four years since introducing hi-vis vests which seems to indicate the increased motorcycle conspicuity of a hi-vis vests has had no beneficial effect.

University of Melbourne’s Chair of Statistics, Prof Richard Huggins, says his review of several studies on motorcycle conspicuity and “look but fail to see” (SMIDSY – Sorry, Mate I Didn’t See You) accidents casts “sufficient doubt” on the effectiveness of hi-vis.

He has previously called for a repeal of the Victorian mandatory requirement.

Click here to read more.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

How to Get Your Motorcycle License

(Sponsored post for our North American readers interested in a bike license)

Do not be one of those drivers who think that they can get away without having a rider’s license, especially when you are riding a motorcycle. As much as you think you can evade the law, you will eventually get caught. Remember that the penalties and consequences are extreme. After buying your motorcycle, you should, therefore, have your motorcycle license completed as well. Here’s how:

1. Take a motorcycle safety course.

Before you are given the papers for you to comply with motorcycle licensing requirements, you must first take a motorcycle safety course. Whether or not this aspect is required, you should still go through it as a precautionary measure. It has been found that a majority of motorcycle deaths and accidents result from drivers who have never been through any formal motorcycle test.

As thrilling as your motorcycle might be, remember that you are at the mercy of only two wheels, which is so much more dangerous than the more stable four-wheeled vehicles. Consider taking a motorcycle practice permit test before taking the actual exam so that you can enhance your driving performance.

2. Comply with the motorcycle licensing requirements in your state.License learner LAMS

You cannot be presented with your motorcycle license if you don’t comply with all the requirements. One of the most common requirements that you will have to comply with is a written exam. Apart from the exam, you will also need to comply with the following requirements:

  • Age requirement
  • Motorcycle permit requirements

To be more specific about the requirements, you can go one step further by checking with your local licensing office as this can vary from state to state.

3. Pay the necessary fees.

Obtaining a motorcycle license is not free. You will have to pay for the issuance. Therefore, you have to be ready for this expense as well. As an additional cost, apart from paying your necessary fees, do set aside some money to buy yourself safety gear and helmets, too.

Conclusion

Although the law varies from one state to another, the process of obtaining your motorcycle license will most likely just be the same. If there is any difference, it might only be the minor specifications or requirements of each state, which one may have over another. As taxing as it may seem for you to have your license made, you should make it a point to get one, before you hit the road.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Hartford Classic 250 motorbike review

The Hartford Classic 250 rides into Australia on a nostalgic wave of small-capacity neo-classic motorcycles appealing to hip young among commuters.

At just $4799 plus on-road costs, it’s a bargain way to enter the market or add a second bike to your garage.

Hartford motorcycles and scooters are made in Taiwan and imported by Joe Fisher of Hartford Australia, based in Ballina.

Joe also imports the Hartford 125cc Sienna ($3399) and 300cc Vita ($6199) scooters. The Sienna comes with a one-year warranty and the Vita with a 24-month warranty.

Hartford Classic 250
Hartford Vita and Sienna scooters (All images by Jeff Gough)

He recently invited me to ride the bike and scooters over Mt Tamborine in south-east Queensland.

Classic 250Hartford Classic 250

First impression of the Classic 250 is that it looks great.

Styling is very retro and quality of parts and build is as good as bargain Japanese bikes.

If you are into customising bikes, there wouldn’t be much to do as the front and rear fenders are chopped already and the rest of the bike’s styling is spot-on.

Perhaps the only modifications I’d make is swapping to Ace bars and bar-end mirrors for a cafe racer look or MX bars and upswept pipe for a scrambler/tracker feel.

Surprisingly the Classic 250 has an easy-to-read digital single instrument dial and all LED lighting. That means headlight, indicators, brake and taillight are all bright LEDs.Hartford Classic 250

The bike also comes with front and rear discs with ABS as required on all 125cc+ motorcycles from November this year.

It is powered by an air-cooled 223cc four-stroke engine with just 13kW of power at a dizzy 9000 revs.

You have to rev it and use the gears to get the most out of the single-cylinder engine, but it will run ahead of most of the city traffic up to a claimed top speed of 111km/h.

However, the transmission is geared way too low and you quickly flick through to the fifth and final gear by 60km/h where it buzzes quite a lot.

Joe says he plans to add a tooth to the front to decrease the ratios and provide a better spread of gears.

That would decrease the buzz and mean fewer gear changes in traffic which would be handy as the cable clutch is quite heavy. However, the transmission feels as slick as most Japanese models with no false neutrals and neutral easy to find.Hartford Classic 250

At just 132kg wringing wet, it’s as light as a feather and a joy to flick around the city streets.

I wasn’t particular happy with the standard Taiwanese Duro HF308 tyres on the 18-inch wheels.

They look like classic Firestone tyres with that zig-zag tread and angular edge. That makes them flop a bit in corners which takes a bit of getting used to. They also are plasticky and grip isn’t great.

Suspension is rudimentary with soft forks that dive under braking and a hard spring with an under-damped shock, yet it all works just fine thanks to the low bike weight.

I didn’t encounter any dramas over the bumps and lumps of Mt T carrying my 80kg frame around, but a heavier rider might struggle.

Over our short ride, we didn’t get a chance to drain a tank, but the claimed economy of 2.5L/100km would provide more than 450km of range from the generous 12-litre tank.

Joe is offering a 24-month and 24,000km warranty. He hopes to have dealers in Ballina, the Gold Coast and Brisbane.

Hartford scooters

Hartford Classic 250
Hartford Vita scooter

The scooters also looked like Japanese quality scooters and behaved in a similar manner.

Their prices and features make them a great bargain.

They would make a great second machine as an alternative for commuting, small grocery shopping or a quick ride to your favourite cafe.

Hartford Classic 250Hartford Classic 250

  • Price: $4799 (+ORC)
  • Warranty: 2 years/24,000km
  • Engine: 223cc, single-cylinder, four-stroke
  • Power: 12kW @ 9000rpm
  • Transmission: 5-speed, chain drive
  • Brakes: discs, ABS
  • Wet weight: 132kg
  • Wheels: 350×18; 400×18
  • Fuel tank: 12 litres
  • Economy: 2.5L/100km
  • Length: 2000mm
  • Width: 800mm
  • Height: 1070mm
  • Wheelbase: 1340mm
  • Website: https://hartfordmotorcycles.com.au/

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Review suggests increasing rider ages

A review of the South Australian Graduated Licensing System has suggested lifting the ages for learner riders from 16 to 18 and full-licensed riders from 20 to 21.5.

Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries (FCAI) motorcycle spokesman Rhys Griffiths says tougher licensing laws across the nation have put the motorcycle industry under “more pressure than we’ve ever had in the past”.

Rider agesSA considers increasing rider ages

However, he says it is difficult to argue against stricter licensing measures such as higher learner ages in the wake of increasing motorcycle rider fatality rates.

“As soon as you start going on about the idea of arguing to have less experienced or skilled riders on the road, you are on a hiding to nothing,” he says.

Rhys also rejects the idea of subsidised training courses for riders.

“The problem is most people use their motorcycle for recreation, so the argument would be why should one recreation get subsidies over another, such as gun shooting or anything else?” he asks.

“As an industry we have a difficult argument to progress.

“How does an industry body argue that they should be making it easer or subsidised.”

Rhys agrees that a recent rise in unlicensed rider crashes could be the result of tougher and more expensive licensing laws.

“People do take the risk and ride unlicensed, particularly in the bush, rather than going through the right system,” he says.

“Now in Victoria it costs over $1000 to get a licence.”

Costs are similar in other states and it takes more than a couple of years to reach full licence status. Queensland riders have to hold a car licence for a year before applying for a motorcycle licence.

Licensing reviewSA considers increasing rider ages

The South Australian review of the Graduated Licensing System was undertaken by the University of Adelaide’s Centre for Automotive Safety Research (CASR).

The 15 key recommendations included increasing rider age to reduce the crashes involving 16- and 17-year-old riders and reducing crashes involving motorcyclists holding a learner permit or R-Date licence class.

Under the recommendations, pre-learner and learner age would be lifted from 16 to 18 and unrestricted licence from 20 to 21 and six months.

Other recommendations include displaying correct plates, restricting pillions, mandatory carriage of licence, a night curfew, zero blood alcohol, a lower demerit point threshold for disqualification, no mobile phones and hi-vis vests for novices like in Victoria.

A total of 1553 participants responded to the consultation, while key road safety stakeholders, motorcycling industry representatives and other interested parties provided feedback through formal submissions.

The consultation outcomes report Protecting South Australia’s Novice Motorcyclists: Outcomes from Public Consultation outlines the feedback from the community and stakeholders.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com