Tag Archives: Laverda

Laverda Corse 1000 3C endurance racer

Laverda Corse 1000 3C

With Phil Aynsley


With Laverda’s new 1000 3C triple entering production in 1972, the company began development of an endurance racing version to take over from their successful 750 twin. After racing during the 1974 season revealed a tendency for a high speed weave to upset the bike (not to mention the riders), designer Luciano Zen introduced the distinctive ‘Space Frame’ chassis.

Laverda Corse 1000 3C endurance racer

A very large fairing was also fitted to provide superior weather protection during 24 hour races. The fuel tank was enlarged to 24 litres. A major change was the alternator being moved forward, providing increased ground clearance.

Laverda Corse 1000 3C endurance racer

Riders for the 1975 season included some well known names – Augusto Brettoni (with 13 Laverda mounted victories), Roberto Gallina (GP racer and later 500GP team owner), Marco Lucchinelli (who began his career with the team) and Georges Fougeray. The team’s best results were a 5th at Barcelona and a 10th at Spa.

Luciano Zen introduced the distinctive “Space Frame” chassis

Of the five bikes constructed only three are known to still exist, this one being a part of the Laverda Corse collection, with power ouput quoted as 95 hp at 7,800 rpm, with a wet weight of 210kg, while top speed was 240 km/h.

Source: MCNews.com.au

Laverda’s attempt to compete with Vespa and Lambretta

Laverda’s 49 Mini Scooter

With Phil Aynsley


The Laverda name conjures up thought of big brawny triples and twins – scooters? Not so much…

PA LaverdaMiniScooterLaverda’s 49 Mini scooter

However as a result of changes to the Italian highway code in 1959 (which saw the requirement for mopeds to have pedals abolished, while letting them be used without number plates or a driving licence, with a maximum speed of 40 km/h), Laverda designed a scooter to compete with Vespa and Lambretta.

PA LaverdaMiniScooterLaverda’s 49 Mini scooter PA LaverdaMiniScooterLaverda’s 49 Mini scooter

Production of the 49 Mini started in 1960 with the single seat machine using a 48.9cc OHV four-stroke motor that used a cast iron barrel fitted with an alloy cylinder head.

PA LaverdaMiniScooterLaverda’s 49 Mini scooter PA LaverdaMiniScooterLaverda’s 49 Mini scooter

A two-speed gearbox was fitted. Flywheel magneto ignition was employed and a Dell’Orto carburettor was fed by a four-litre fuel tank positioned under the seat.

PA LaverdaMiniScooterLaverda’s 49 Mini scooter PA LaverdaMiniScooterLaverda’s 49 Mini scooter

In 1962 new versions fitted with a 50cc or 60cc motor, three-speed gearbox and a lengthened seat were introduced. These were also sold in Spain as the Montesa Micro Scooter.

PA LaverdaMiniScooterLaverda’s 49 Mini scooter

Output of the 49 Mini was 1.3 hp at 4500 rpm, with a weight of 40 kg and top speed of 40km/h.

PA LaverdaMiniScooterLaverda’s 49 Mini scooter
Source: MCNews.com.au

Laverda OR600 Atlas ‘Adventure Motorcycle’

With Phil Aynsley


Laverda had quite a history of producing off-road bikes over the years and actually had a lot of input (as development engineers), into the design of BMW’s extremely successful G/S series – so it should come as no surprise that they also took a crack at the large capacity on/off-road market themselves with the introduction of the OR600 Atlas in 1986.

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda’s OR600 Atlas

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

An updated version of the 500cc parallel twin (which had in fact been out of production for several years) had a capacity of 571cc and featured lower compression and softer camshafts than the original.

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda’s OR600 Atlas Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda’s OR600 Atlas

New pistons and bigger valves together with modified heads and barrels were used. In addition strengthened crankcases, helical primary drive gears, a second balance weight and most importantly an oil cooler and larger oil pump were fitted.

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda’s OR600 Atlas

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

300 were built in 1986 but subsequent years saw only 60, 40 and 50 made for a total of 450 units. The blue/white Series 2 bikes were produced in ’87 and ’88 with Series 3 being constructed in ’89. Series 3 had a red/white paint job and twin, side-mounted oil coolers.

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda’s OR600 Atlas

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

This particular bike is the 1985 prototype and was extensively ridden by Laverda’s sales director, Giulo Frazan and is unrestored. Note that the muffler was not fitted at the time of photography.

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda’s OR600 Atlas

Also note that the engine number hasn’t been stamped, which was fairly usual for the company’s prototypes. Additionally the frame number is OR1000 – which is a factory mistake as all their prototypes started at 1001 (and that is the number on the paperwork)!

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda’s OR600 Atlas

Power was 50 hp at 7000 rpm which, with a dry weight of 151 kg, gave a top speed of 175 km/h.

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda Atlas ORR PA LaverdaOR

Laverda’s OR600 Atlas
Source: MCNews.com.au

Laverda 500 Alpino | Zeta | Formula 500

Laverda 500 Alpino & Formula racer

With Phil Aynsley


Released in 1977 Laverda’s 500cc parallel twin was designed to be a light-weight, sporty, everyday machine. A marked contrast to their 1000cc triples.

Laverda Parallel Twin PA Laverda
Laverda 500 Alpino
Laverda Parallel Twin PA Laverda
Laverda 500 Alpino

The specifications were quite advanced with DOHC and four-valve heads. It was also the first non Japanese production motorcycle with a six speed gearbox. Originally named the Alpina for the UK market, that was soon changed to the Alpino. In the US it was known as the Zeta.

Laverda Parallel Twin PA Laverda
Laverda 500 Alpino
Laverda Parallel Twin PA Laverda
Laverda 500 Alpino

Laverda Parallel Twin PA Laverda

The only major engine change during its production life was the fitment of a counterbalance shaft in 1978. Production ceased in 1982. However the Alpino formed the basis for the more famous Formula and Montjuic models. The motor (somewhat updated) was used in 1985 to power the OR600 Atlas enduro bike as well as the later 668 and 750 that were built up until 2000.

Laverda Parallel Twin PA Laverda
Laverda 500 Alpino

Laverda Parallel Twin PA Laverda

Laverda Parallel Twin PA Laverda
Laverda 500 Alpino

This particular bike is one of the last that came off the line in 1982 and is used by Laverda Corse as their track learning bike. It has non standard rear shocks and rack and offered 38hp at 8500rpm with a wet weight of 170kg, and top speed of 175km/h.


The Laverda Cup & Laverda Formula 500

Laverda Parallel Twin PA LaverdaF

The Laverda Cup race series was instigated by the company when the Italian government introduced a punitive 35% tax on motorcycles over 500cc in 1977 – just prior to the release of the 500 twin.

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Laverda Formula 500

Laverda Parallel Twin PA LaverdaF

It was one of the first, if not the first, single model race series and ran from 1978 to 1981. Three batches of Formula machines were produced, each of 70 bikes – in ’78, ’79 and ’81.

Laverda Parallel Twin PA LaverdaF
Laverda Formula 500

Laverda Parallel Twin PA LaverdaF

The Formula was basically an Alpino S with an upgraded motor which used the S1 race cam, pistons that raised the compression ratio to 10.5:1 and a close ratio gearbox.

Laverda Parallel Twin PA LaverdaF
Laverda Formula 500

Laverda Parallel Twin PA LaverdaF

Laverda Parallel Twin PA LaverdaF

Sandcast rear sets and Menani clip-ons were fitted along with the race fairing and seat/tank unit. The removal of all the street equipment meant that, despite the additional bodywork, the Formula was 16kg lighter than the standard bike.

Laverda Parallel Twin PA LaverdaF
Laverda Formula 500

Laverda Parallel Twin PA LaverdaF

This 1979 bike is in “as finished” condition and is original apart from the additional seat padding, with power output 52hp at 10,000rpm, a wet weight of 160kg and top speed of 200km/h.

Laverda Parallel Twin PA LaverdaF
Laverda Formula 500

Source: MCNews.com.au

Honda CB750 features at Laverda Concours

The venerable Honda CB750 will be a highlight of the 31st annual Laverda Concours which includes free entry for concours motorcycles.

The Laverda Concours is the biggest and best motorcycle show in Queensland and one of the biggest in the nation. The concours gets its name from Club Laverda Queensland who began the show in 1982 with the Ducati Owners Club who later pulled out.

It will be held this year on Sunday, July 21, at the Redland Showgrounds.

Honda CB750 displayHonda CB750

About 30 Honda CB750 models will on display to celebrate the bike’s 50th anniversary.

Honda 750/4 Club spokesman John McNair says their display will include race bikes, some with Rickman kits and a racing outfit.

“Some will be in their original unrestored condition and some will be pristine restored bikes,” John says.

“We will have several from among the first 50 sold in the country, including sandcast and even a diecast model worth up to about $30,000.”

Free concours entryLaverda Councors

The Laverda Concours gate price for spectators remains at $10 for over 15s with free on-site motorcycle parking.

However, Concours event manager Bryan Horn says they have removed the $10 fee to enter your motorcycle in the concours.

“That’s big news and should equate to more bikes in the paddock,” he says.

“We want to focus on enthusiast clubs this year.

“Not only will the Hondas 750/4 Club have a display but there will be a special trophy supplied by Oliver’s Motorcycles for the best Triumph Bonneville to mark its 60th anniversary.

“I’ve also had a call from an historic motorcycle club member in Rockhampton who says he is bringing his 1959 model,” Bryan says.

“We are keen to highlight the vibrant enthusiast motorcycle club community here in the great South East.”

Concours details2016 Laverda Concours results

The Concours starts from 6am with some 60 trophies available and $2000 for the best machine of the day.

Motorcycles, scooters, trikes, etc entered for judging must be in running order.

The event is alcohol free and raises funds for Make-a-Wish Australia. Over the past 15 years the club has donated more than $92,000 to the charity.

There will also be trade stalls, entertainment plus food vendors and children’s rides. However, there will be no dyno this year.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Laverda 750 SFC | Fritz Egli Racer as raced at Imola 200

With Phil Aynsley


This is one of two bikes commissioned in 1972 from Fritz Egli by the Swiss Laverda importer, Roland Borel. The bike raced in national as well as international events including the first Imola 200.

PA Laverda SFC Fritz Egli
Fritz Egli Laverda 750 SFC Racer

Compared to a standard SFC the bike is considerably lower, has a shorter wheelbase (1400mm vs 1470mm), has more ground clearance and at 185kg weighs about 20kg less.

PA Laverda SFC Fritz Egli
This custom 750 SFC features a shorter 1400mm wheelbase

Ceriani GP forks, Lockheed calipers with Scarab discs as well as a Grimeca rear brake are fitted.

PA Laverda SFC Fritz Egli
The bike is also 20kg lighter than the standard version

Egli went on to make a further 25 frames for the 750 Laverda (up until 1974), before switching to the 1000 triple.

PA Laverda SFC Fritz Egli
Fritz Egli produced 25 more frames for the 750
PA Laverda SFC Fritz Egli
This machine was commissioned by Swiss Laverda importer, Roland Borel
PA Laverda SFC Fritz Egli
Fritz Egli Laverda 750 SFC Racer
PA Laverda SFC Fritz Egli
Fritz Egli Laverda 750 SFC Racer
PA Laverda SFC Fritz Egli
Fritz Egli Laverda 750 SFC Racer
PA Laverda SFC Fritz Egli
Fritz Egli Laverda 750 SFC Racer
PA Laverda SFC Fritz Egli
Fritz Egli Laverda 750 SFC Racer

Source: MCNews.com.au

Cor Dees’ Laverda Museum | Laverda heaven

Cor Dees’ Laverda Museum

With Phil Aynsley


Cor Dees was a Dutchman with a serious Laverda addiction! He bought his first Laverda in 1988 and, as can be seen, added the odd one or two after that.

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The Laverda Museum

He constructed this purpose built building in Lisse which opened in 2006 and I photographed there in 2015.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

Unfortunately, due to ill health, it had to be closed in 2017 and the collection has since been sold. Thus it was lucky that I was there to shoot these bikes well before then, and can now present this incredible collection here for your enjoyment.

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The Laverda Museum was put together by Cor Dees

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The Laverda Museum – Unfortunately due to ill health it was closed

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The Laverda Museum – The collection was later sold off

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – 81 models were featured alongside extensive memorabilia

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The Laverda Museum – Dees started collecting in ’88 but quickly became addicted to the iconic Italian brand

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The Laverda Museum – Dees built a close relation with the Laverda family

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The Laverda Museum

Cor built up a close relationship with the Laverda family and was able, with the help of the late Massimo Laverda, to obtain the remaining spare parts and two incomplete V6 prototypes as well as vast quantities of period advertising material, film, documentation and other memorabilia. In all some 81 bikes, scooters and mopeds comprised the collection, covering the years from 1950 to 2000.

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This was the original Laverda sign over the factory and weighs in at 400kg

This is the 400kg marble sign that hung over the entrance to the Laverda factory from 1952 until the building was demolished in 2000.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – The collection included a number of race machines

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – Including the brand’s V6

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

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The Laverda Museum – The 1000cc V6 (closest)

The line up of race bikes includes the legendary 1000cc V6 (link), one of the three 1000cc space-frame triple endurance machines, the ’75 750 SFC that won the Belgian Championship and the company’s only GP bike – the ’87 125cc prototype (link).

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The Laverda Museum – An original Laverda drawing board

One of the original drafting boards.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

Laverda manufactured a wide range of agricultural equipment from their founding in 1873, such as this press.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda name is actually used to continue to produce heavy farm machinery to this day

While no longer in family hands, the Laverda company still makes tractors and other heavy farm machinery.

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The Laverda Museum – Scooters

There is a wide range of memorabilia on display. Also a neat 200cc twin and several scooter models.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – A 750 GTL in police get-up

The Police version of the 750 GTL.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – 1971 1000cc triple prototype

This is most likely the 1000cc triple prototype bike that Laverda displayed at the Milan Show in 1971.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – A 1981 RGS 1000 in touring form

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

A 1981 RGS 1000 fitted with the saddlebags and fairing from the later Executive model.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

Laverda is hardly known for its off road models but the company produced quite a number over the years. Here a 600 Atlas (left) and a 250 Chott (right) find themselves above the Husqvarna powered LH3 (125cc) and LH4 (250cc).

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – The company also produced off-road machines

The 250TR Chott, ISDE version.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

A line up of early bikes.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum

The Navarro was released in 1990 as the update to the Lesmo. The bodywork was more encompassing, the wheels 17 inch and disc brakes fitted front and rear. The 125cc 2-stroke was the same motor fitted to the Cagiva Freccia C12R. Only a few hundred were sold due to the combination of somewhat dated specification and high price. Power was 29 hp at 10,300 rpm, with a dry weight of 115 kg.

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The Laverda Museum – A 650 vertical twin on the right

The first of the “new” vertical twins was the 650 which was introduced in May 1968 (link) before quickly being superseded by the 750. Somewhere between 50 and 200 were built.

LaverdaMuseum
The Laverda Museum – 750GT in blue

The 1000 prototype with a 750GT.

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The Laverda Museum – A 1971 Laverda 750 SF1

Source: MCNews.com.au

Laverda 1000C | Laverda’s 1000cc Triple

Laverda Triple Cylinder Prototype

With Phil Aynsley


The Laverda 1000 triple was first seen at the Geneva Show in 1969. At this early stage the motor was basically a 750 twin with an extra cylinder grafted on. It was still a single OHC design with the starter behind the cylinders and the belt-driven generator in front.

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Laverda’s 3C Prototype

However by 1971 Massimo Laverda and Luciano Zen had massively reworked the design. It now sported a DOHC cylinder head with narrow angled valves, together with very substantial crankcases.

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Laverda’s 3C Prototype

The original 120º crank was replaced by a 180º unit (the outside pistons moving together, with the centre piston 180º out of phase).

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Laverda’s 3C Prototype

The new design was first displayed at the 1971 Milan Show, named the 1000C, and the bike I photographed is in fact this prototype, with engine number 1000 001.

PA Laverda C Proto
Laverda’s 3C Prototype

By comparison to the production bikes that followed in 1972, it is quite unique with sand-cast cases of a different pattern, 750 instruments and handlebar, ignition key placement and even sand-cast Dell’Orto carbs.

PA Laverda C Proto
Laverda’s 3C Prototype

The 180º motor was replaced by a rubber-mounted 120º in 1982 and after evolving through a total of 16 different models production of the triple ceased in 1986.

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Laverda’s 3C Prototype

PA Laverda C Proto
Laverda’s 3C Prototype

PA Laverda C Proto
Laverda’s 3C Prototype

PA Laverda C Proto
Laverda’s 3C Prototype

PA Laverda C Proto
Laverda’s 3C Prototype

PA Laverda C Proto
Laverda’s 3C Prototype

PA Laverda C Proto
Laverda’s 3C Prototype

Source: MCNews.com.au