Tag Archives: h2

Kawasaki plans Bimota hub-centre steering

Kawasaki used to supply engines for esoteric Italian motorcycle manufacturer Bimota and now they are collaborating to share engineering ideas such as hub-centre steering.

The first result of their collaboration is the upcoming Tesi H2 powered by a Kawasaki H2 supercharged 998cc inline four.

Not only is it propelled by the stonking supercharged H2 engine, but there is a fair bit of H2 in the “origami” design.

It now appears that the bike is near production with this image on the Bimota social media.

Bimota Tesi H2Bimota Tesi H2

In a reciprocal arrangement it seems Bimota’s predilection for hub-centre steering may make its way into a future Kawasaki.

The Japanese company has recently applied for a patent for a strikingly similar front suspension setup.Kawasaki Bimota hub-centre steering patent

Don’t you think it looks very much like the Tesi H2?

Bimota Tesi H2Bimota Tesi H2

Hub-centre steering

Hub-centre steering has been around since 1910, so it’s interesting that Kawasaki would ask for a patent.

Perhaps their design is slightly differennt.

It typically has the steering pivot points inside the hub of the wheel, rather than above the wheel in the headstock as in the traditional layout.

Australian film animator and self-taught engineer Ray Van Steenwyk has also invented a variation of the hub-centre arrangement.

It’s called the Motoinno TS3 and is based on an air-cooled Ducati 900 SS.Motoinno TS3 with centre steering

They claim the advantages are no dive under brakes, adjustable rake, a tighter turning circle and improve corner handling.

we’ve also seen huib-cetre steering making a bit of a comeback in some electric motorcycle designs such as this Japanese Zec00.

Zec00 electric motorcycleZec00

Tesi H2

Meanwhile, there is no word yet on price for the limited-edition Tesi H2, but there is a rumour it will be near $A100,000.Bimota Tesi H2However, you can bet it will be eye-wateringly expensive being fettled with Öhlins suspension, Brembo brakes, plenty of carbon fibre and CNC machined bits and pieces.

As a guide, the current Ducati-powered Tesi 3D EVO is $A50,890 and the Tesi 3D Naked is $55,990.

Bimota Tesi 3DBimota Tesi 3D

That’s a lot more than the current Kawasaki H2 at $29,290, H2 SX SE at $34,999 or the Carbon version at $40,400.

Most significantly, the power figure has now been released and it’s the same as the H2 at 170kW (228hp), not like the track-only H2R at 240kW.

The current Tesi 3D models are powered by a 1078cc Ducati air-cooled engine from the old Monster 1100 which only outputs 78kW.Bimota Tesi H2

Tesi H2 will also be 24kg lighter than the H2 at 214kg, despite the seemingly heavy hub-centre steering.

Bimota history

Bimota has worked with Kawasaki before, using their engines and we expect the new ownership arrangement to result in more collaborative models.

The Italian boutique manufacturer was founded in 1973 in Rimini, Italy by Valerio Bianchi, Giuseppe Morri, and Massimo Tamburini who designed the beautiful Ducati 916 and equally elegant MV Agusta F4.

They have also had relationships other motorcycles manufacturers such as Ducati and the other Japanese manufacturers.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Kawasaki supercharges Bimota Tesi H2

Kawasaki is supercharging Bimota which it recently bought with the launch of the Tesi H2 powered by their H2 supercharged 998cc inline four.

Not only is it propelled by the stonking supercharged H2 engine, but there is a fair bit of H2 in the “origami” design.

It follows the release last week of Kawasaki’s fourth model in the H2 range, the naked Z H2.

Kawasaki Z H2 - Bimota
Kawasaki Z H2

Tesi H2

There is no word yet on price for the limited-edition Tesi H2.Bimota Tesi H2ension

However, you can bet it will be eye-wateringly expensive being fettled with Öhlins suspension, Brembo brakes, plenty of carbon fibre and CNC machined bits and pieces.

As a guide, the current Ducati-powered Tesi 3D EVO is $A50,890 and the Tesi 3D Naked is $55,990.

Bimota Tesi 3D
Bimota Tesi 3D

That’s a lot more than the current Kawasaki H2 at $29,290, H2 SX SE at $34,999 or the Carbon version at $40,400.

Bimota is also not releasing a lot of technical details, although we can see they are continuing with their front swingarm instead of conventional forks.Bimota Tesi H2

But most significantly, the power figure is missing.

Kawasaki’s track-only H2R has 240kW of power, the H2 is set at 170kW and the SX SE and new naked are both 147kW.

We tip it will be somewhere between the H2 and H2R.

The current Tesi 3D models are powered by a 1078cc Ducati air-cooled engine from the old Monster 1100 which only outputs 78kW.Bimota Tesi H2

Bimota history

Bimota has worked with Kawasaki before, using their engines and we expect the new ownership arrangement to result in more collaborative models.

The Italian boutique manufacturer was founded in 1973 in Rimini, Italy by Valerio Bianchi, Giuseppe Morri, and Massimo Tamburini who designed the beautiful Ducati 916 and equally elegant MV Agusta F4.

They have also had relationships other motorcycles manufacturers such as Ducati and the other Japanese manufacturers.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Kawasaki unveils naked and supercharged Z H2

Kawasaki has just announced their naked and supercharged Z H2 will arrive in Australia early next year.

It’s not quite naked with a sporty nose-cone fairing, but it is more exposed than the current range of H2, H2 Carbon, track-only H2R and super-touring H2 SX SE+.

Z H2 will arrive in metallic spark black with metallic graphite grey and mirror-coated spark black with pricing yet to be confirmed. However, it should cost less than the H2 at $29,9990 (plus on-road costs).

Z H2 powerKawasaki Z H2

Power and torque will also be a little lower at 147.1kW compared with 170kW and torque at 137Nm com[ared with the H2’s 141.7Nm.

Kawasaki says this is more manageable power that will make it easier to ride and “you would be more likely to want to ride it every day, regardless of where you had to go”.

Strangely, stripped of much of its fairing, it will actually 1kg more at 239kg.Kawasaki Z H2

Kawasaki says it will include the following features:

  • Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU);
  • Hydraulic Assist & Slipper Clutch;
  • Kawasaki Quick Shifter for up and down shifts;
  • New TFT display with Rideology THE APP Bluetooth connectivity;
  • Trellis Frame;
  • Showa suspension; and
  • 4 Integrated Riding modes: Sport, Road, Rain and Rider mode.

Kawasaki Z H2 (ZR1000K) specs

  • Engine: 9983cc liquid-cooled, 16-valve, in-line four
  • Compression: 11.2:1
  • Bore x stroke: 76.0 × 55.0 mm
  • Power: 147.1 kW @ 11,000rpm
  • Torque: 137Nm @ 8500rpm
  • Transmission: 6-speed
  • Frame: Trellis, high-tensile steel
  • Tyres: 120/70ZR17 M/C 58W; 190/55ZR17 M/C 75W
  • Wheels: 17M/C × MT3.50; 17M/C × MT6.00
  • Rake and trail: 24.9, 104mm
  • Brakes:  290mm discs, 226mm disc
  • Length: 2085mm
  • Width: 810mm
  • Height: 1130mm
  • Wheelbase: 1455mm
  • Clearance: 140mm
  • Seat: 830mm
  • Kerb weight: 239kg
  • Tank: 19 litresKawasaki Z H2

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Will Kawasaki supercharge the Z1000?

A teaser video from Kawasaki showing a supercharger and the letter “Z” seems to indicate the company is about to expand its supercharged lineup, possibly the Z1000.

Currently the company supercharges its H2, H2R track-only model and H2 SX super tourer.

Kawasaki H2 SX SE supercharged tourer centre
Kawasaki H2 SX SE supercharged tourer

Super Z1000

The video shows a “Z”, not a “ZX”, so it is likely to supercharge the top of the Z fleet, the Z1000, rather than the ZX-14R, although that would be hoot!

We don’t expect they would supercharge their Z900RS and Z900RS Cafe retro models.

But they could also introduce it in the Z900 or even the Z650, although that would rule it out of learner-approved status.

Kawasaki is no stranger to forced induction with the GPZ750 turbo way back in the 1982.

With the success of the retro Z900 RS models, maybe the Japanese manufacturer is bringing back the 750cc displacement to honour the GPZ750.

Japanese motorcycle z1000
Kawasaki GPZ750 Turbo

The new supercharged Kwaka could be introduce at the Tokyo Motor Show next month or at EICMA motorcycle show in Milan in November.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Yamaha’s future might be blown!

Yamaha might be going down the blown track like Honda, Suzuki, Kawasaki and Ducati with a patent filing for a turbocharged parallel twin.

It follows Kawasaki’s H2 supercharged bike and patent filings by Suzuki and Honda for turbocharged engines, while Ducati applied for a patent for an exhaust system turbine.

So it seems the future for motorcycle engines might be blown, either with forced induction or exhaust.

Blown filing

The Yamaha patent filing shows drawings of a turbo in an MT-09 which is actually powered by a triple-cylinder engine.

However, patent drawings don’t necessarily mean they will build the engine, the bike or use the MT-09 to house the engine.

If it’s the MT-09 engine with a cylinder lobbed off, it would be about 588cc which would be the same engine capacity as the Suzuki Recursion turbo concept unveiled in 2013 with a single-overhead-cam parallel-twin turbo engine.

Suzuki Recursion - Katana turbo blown
Suzuki Recursion

Blown era

The switch to smaller, lighter, more powerful yet more fuel-efficient blown bikes makes a lot of sense given the stricter emissions rules in Europe and California, as well as tough imposts such as a charges for or restrictions on older bikes entering CBDs.

Turbo was the “next big thing” back in the ’80s with models from several of the Japanese manufacturers, including the Honda CB500 Turbo, Yamaha XJ650 Turbo, Suzuki XN85, and Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo.

They had manic light-switch power that made them not only difficult to control, but dangerous. They were also temperamental and unreliable.

However, modern low-boost mini turbos and superchargers which have revolutionised the car industry in recent years would be a lot more controllable and reliable than the temperamental rocketships of the ‘80s.

Turbo problems

Turbos and superchargers require a fair bit of plumbing and coolers.

They are easy to fit in a car where space is not scarce like on a motorcycle.

The Yamaha patent presents two different solutions to the problem.Yamaha turbo blown

In one filling, the exhaust headers merge into one to pipe the gas through an intercooler into a low-mounted turbocharger in front of the engine with the catalytic converter underneath.

The other filing (top image on this page) has the turbo upside down and closer to the headers, allowing the cat to be mounted in front of the cylinders.

It is not only more compact but would also heat the cat faster and decrease emissions.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com