Tag Archives: Aprilia

Aprilia Tuareg 660 arrives in Australia

Aprilia has added a third family to its new 660 range with the Tuareg 660 and Tuareg 660 L adventure models arriving in Australia this year.

The unrestricted Tuareg 660 arrives in May/June from $22,230 rideaway while the downtuned L “learner approved” model is coming in July with pricing yet to be confirmed.

Both come in a choice of Acid Gold, Martian Red or Indaco Tagelmust which is indigo (dark blue) and white and red, reflecting Aprila’s 1980s Dakar Rally race bikes. The latter colour scheme adds $300 to the price.

Powered by the 660 twin-cylinder engine from the naked Touno 660 and RS 660 sports bike, the Tuareg 660 outputs the 58.8kW of power at 10,500 revs which is down from the 75kW off the other models.

More importantly, torque is 3Nm higher at 70Nm of torque and the maximum output comes on at 6500rpm which is 2000 revs less.

The L model is restricted for Australian LAMS rules to 35kW and 61Nm.

These mid-sized Touareg models pay homage to the first Aprilia Tuareg ETX 125 in 1985 and the bikes that unsuccessfully contest the famous Dakar Rally in the 1980s.

Both feature a steel frame with the engine stress-mounted and a double aluminium swingarm.

Despite its thin frame, it still thankfully accommodates as generous 18-litre tank that will ensure it can conquer the vast distances of the Aussie outback between servos.

These adventure bikes sit on off-road oriented 2.5 x 21-inch front and 4.5 x 18-inch rear rims shod with Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR tyres, 90/90 up front and 150/70 in the rear.

They feature Brembo brakes with 300mm double discs and a 260mm disnlge disc on the back.

They come with an host of electric ic rider aids to help conquer the varied conditions of our country.

The Aprilia Performance Ride Control (APRC) electronic controls package includes:

  • ATC: Aprilia Traction Control, that can be adjusted to 4 levels or disabled;
  • ACC: Aprilia Cruise Control;
  • AEB: Aprilia Engine Brake to prevent rear-wheel lock up on downshifts, adjustable to 3 levels.
  • AEM: Aprilia Engine Map, 3 different mappings for throttle response, but do not change the maximum power delivered.  

You can also option up with an AQS: Aprilia Quick Shift electronic gearbox for clutchless shifts up or down the ratios.

There are four Riding Modes that adjust settings for traction control, engine brake, ABS and all the other managed parameters.

Urban and Explore are dedicated to street riding with ABS on, while Off-Road disables ABS on the rear and Individual lets you fully personalise the electronic controls.

You can control everything via controls mounted on the left and right switch blocks with info scrolled through the TFT screen.

The instruments also feature Aralia’s multimedia platform so you connect your smartphone and controls phone calls, sat nav and music.

Aprilia has also developed a range of special accessories such as protection, lighting, comfort seats and luggage systems as well as a line of adventure riding gear.

Tuareg 660 and Tuareg 660 L

Engine Aprilia forward-facing twin-cylinder, 4-stroke, liquid cooled, dual overhead cam (DOHC) with silent chain drive on the right side, four valve per cylinder.
Bore and stroke 81 x 63.93mm
Engine capacity  659cc
Compression 13.5:1
Power 58.8kW (35kW L) @ 9250rpm 
Torque 70Nm (61Nm L) @ 6500rpm 
Fuel system Airbox with front air vent. 2 48mm throttle bodies, Ride-by-wire management
Ignition Electric 
Lubrication Wet sump 
Transmission Six-speed, Aprilia Quick Shift (AQS) System up and down available as accessory
Clutch Multiplate wet clutch with slipper system
Secondary drive Chain, drive ratio 15/42 
Electronics APRC Suite that includes ATC (traction control), AEB (engine brake) AEM (engine maps), ACC (cruise control) 

Four riding modes (Urban, Explore, Off-road, Individual)

Chassis Frame in steel tubing and built-in subframe screwed aluminium plates connecting the frame to the engine
Front suspension Fully adjustable 43mm upside-down Kayaba fork with counterspring. Wheel travel: 240mm
Rear suspension Aluminium swingarm. Progressive linkage. Fully adjustable Kayaba monoshock. Wheel travel: 240mm
Front brake

Rear brake

ABS

300mm double disc 

Brembo callipers with 4 horizontally opposed 30/32mm pistons. Axial pump and metal braided brake line

260mm diameter disc; Brembo single piston 34mm floating calliper. Master cylinder with separate reservoir and metal braided hose

Multimap ABS

Wheels spoked with aluminium drop centre Front: 2.15×21-inch, Rear: 4.25×18-inch
Tyres Tubeless, Front: 90/90-21, Rear: 150/70 R 18
Dimensions Wheelbase: 1525mm 

Length: 2220mm 

Width: 965mm

Saddle height: 860mm 

Headstock angle: 26.7 degrees

Trail: 113.3mm

Weight  204kg kerb weight (187kg dry weight) 
Emissions compliance

Consumption

Euro 5 

4.0 litres/100 km 

CO2 emissions 99g/km 
Fuel tank capacity

Colour range

18 litres (3-litre reserve)

Indaco Tagelmust, Martian Red, Acid Gold

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Learner adventurer set for Australia

Aprilia’s first learner-approved adventure motorcycle, the Tuareg 660 L, will arrive in Australian showrooms by July in three colour schemes.

It comes a month after the release of the full-powered Tuareg 660 in May/June.

Pricing has yet to be confirmed for either bike.

The output of the full-powered version is 58.8kW (80hp) at 9250rpm with 79Nm of torque at 6500 revs.

To qualify under Australia’s learner-approved motorcycle scheme (LAMS), the 660cc parallel-twin engine has been detuned to 35kW (47.6hp) at 5500rpm and 61Nm of torque at 5000rpm.

All other technical features of the learner adventurer are unchanged and include such features as LED lighting, traction control, four riding modes and even cruise control. A quick shifter is available as an accessory.

These adventure models are part of the new 660 platform following the RS 660 and Tuono 660.

They represent a return to adventure riding after the Caponord was discontinued, but promise to be much more dirt oriented with 21-inch front wheels and tubeless tyres on spoked wheels.

Other adventure characteristics are a light wet weight of 204kg, 18-litre fuel tank and fully adjustable Kayaba suspension.

Tuareg revives a model name Aprilia last used in 1985.

The name is also used by VW for their SUV although it is spelt Touareg. Both names refer to a nomadic Sahara tribe.

Tuareg 660 was designed by the Piaggio Advanced Design Centre in Pasadena, California.

It will arrive in a choice of Acid Gold, Martian Red (black and red) and Indaco Tagelmust inspired by the 1988 Tuareg Wind 600.

Expected to arrive in local showrooms in May/June. Pricing has yet to be confirmed.

Aprilia has developed a range of accessories:

  • Lockable aluminium panniers
  • 33-litre aluminium top box
  • Tubular engine guards
  • Auxiliary LED lights
  • Centre stand
  • Chain guide
  • Touring windscreen: this ensures greater protection for the rider from the air for a more comfortable trip. It is made of 4mm thick metacrylate and is sturdy and durable.
  • Comfort seats
  • Aprilia smartphone multimedia system
  • Electronic anti-theft system

Aprilia will also have a range of adventure helmets, clothing and gloves as seen in the photos on this page.

Aprilia Tuareg 660 – Technical specs

Engine type Aprilia forward-facing twin-cylinder, 4-stroke, liquid cooled, dual overhead cam (DOHC) with silent chain drive on the right side, four valve per cylinder.
Bore and stroke 81 x 63.93mm
Engine capacity 659cc
Compression ratio 13.5:1
Maximum power at crankshaft 80hp (58.8kW) at 9250rpm

47.6hp (35kW) at 5500rpm (LAMS)

Maximum torque at crankshaft 70Nm (7.13kgm) at 6500rpm

61Nm at 5000rpm (LAMS)

Fuel system Airbox with front air vent. 2 Æ48mm throttle bodies, Ride-by-wire management
Ignition Electric
Lubrication Wet sump
Transmission Six-speed, Aprilia Quick Shift (AQS) System up and down available as accessory
Clutch Multiplate wet clutch with slipper system
Secondary drive Chain, drive ratio 15/42
Electronics APRC Suite that includes ATC (traction control), AEB (engine brake) AEM (engine maps), ACC (cruise control)
Four riding modes (Urban, Explore, Off-road, Individual)
Chassis Frame in steel tubing and built-in subframe screwed aluminium plates connecting the frame to the engine
Front suspension Fully adjustableÆ 43mm upside-down Kayaba fork with counterspring. Wheel travel: 240mm
Rear suspension Aluminium swingarm. Progressive linkage. Fully adjustable Kayaba monoshock. Wheel travel: 240mm
Front brake

Rear brake

ABS

300mm double disc
Brembo callipers with 4 horizontally opposed Æ 30/32mm pistons. Axial pump and metal braided brake line
260mm diameter disc; Brembo single piston Æ 34mm floating calliper. Master cylinder with separate reservoir and metal braided hose
Multimap ABS
Wheels spoked with aluminium drop centre Front: 2.15×21-inch, Rear: 4.25×18-inch
Tyres Tubeless, Front: 90/90-21, Rear: 150/70 R 18
Dimensions Wheelbase: 1525mm
Length: 2220mm
Width: 965mm
Saddle height: 860mm
Headstock angle: 26.7 degrees
Trail: 113.3mm
Weight 204kg kerb weight (187kg dry weight)
Emissions compliance Consumption Euro 5
4.0 litres/100 km
CO2 emissions 99g/km
Fuel tank capacity
Colour range
18 litres (3-litre reserve)
Indaco Tagelmust, Martian Red, Acid Gold

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

EICMA 2021: Aprilia Tuono 660 Factory, RS 660 Limited Edition Revealed

Last updated:

Aprilia has unveiled two new versions of the popular middle-weight Tuono 660 and RS 660 models at EICMA 2021. The Tuono 660 is now available in a ‘Factory trim, like it’s bigger sibling, while the RS 660 will now have a ‘Limited Edition’ variant.

Aprilia Tuono 660 Factory

The Tuono 660 Factory gets the Aprilia ‘Factory’ treatment and features higher-spec components when compared to the standard model. 

For starters, the 41mm Kayaba USD fork and Sachs monoshock are now fully adjustable for compression, rebound damping, and preload. Aprilia has also managed to shave some weight off the motorcycle by using a lighter lithium battery. The Tuono 660 factory now weighs 181kg — 2kg less than before. 

While the 660cc, forward-facing twin-cylinder engine remains essentially unchanged, there’s a bump in acceleration, thanks to the use of a shorter final drive with a 16-tooth pinion gear, one less than Tuono 660. 

The Tuono 660 Factory offers an extensive list of electronic rider aids, including ATC (Aprilia Traction Control), AWC (Aprilia Wheelie Control), ACC (Aprilia Cruise Control), AQS (Aprilia Quick Shift), AEB (Aprilia Engine Brake), and AEM (Aprilia Engine Map). The bike also offers adjustable cornering ABS and five customizable riding modes. 

Aprilia RS 660 Limited Edition

The RS 660 Limited Edition, meanwhile, features mainly cosmetic updates. Only 1,500 units will be produced, and they will come with a single seat cover, oversized top fairing, and the ability to set the quickshifter to run upside down, like on the GP bikes. 

Bryan Staring with the Ducati Panigale V4R

These 1,500 bikes will also come in a stars and stripes paint job to celebrate Aprilia’s success at the MotoAmerica Twins Cup. 

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Zongshen Showcases Cyclone RA9 V-Twin Concept

The CIMA Motor show in China concluded this past week, and it gave us a glimpse of the many motorcycles and concepts that the country’s manufacturers are working on. A few days back, we covered the two new V4 engines from Benda – one of which is possibly the most potent Chinese-made engine we’ve seen. Now, CycleWorld has reported on another unique concept that made its debut at the show – the Zongshen Cyclone RA9.

For the uninitiated, Zongshen is the Piaggio Group’s partner in China and is responsible for producing their small-capacity motorcycles, like the Aprilia GPR 250. It’s this connection that forms the roots of the Cyclone RA9 concept, as well. The engine on the bike is derived from the V-twin that powers the Aprilia Shiver and Dorsoduro, albeit in a slightly different spec. CycleWorld reports that the Shiver and Dorsoduro 900 are powered by an 896cc twin, while the Dorsoduro 1200 employs a larger 1,197cc V-twin. Meanwhile, the engine on the RA9 displaces 987cc, and Zongshen claims a peak power of 112hp at 9,500rpm with maximum torque of 72ft-lb coming in at 7,500 rpm.

Zongshen-Showcases-Cyclone-RA9-V-Twin-Concept-2

The model showcased looks mainly like a concept bike, but you’ll find that the Cyclone RA9 included many production components. With its tubular steel front and cast alloy rear, the frame is identical to the one on the Shiver and Dorsoduro. However, unlike on those motorcycles, this one uses a single-sided swingarm. The RA9 is a much more radical-looking motorcycle than its Italian counterparts, and it’s evident that it’s meant for just a rider – no pillion, no luggage. Zongshen also mentioned the presence of J.Juan radial brakes, Bosch ABS, and fully adjustable suspension. All of this, putting the bike’s weight at 215kg.

Earlier this year, Zongshen launched the Cyclone RX6, which is powered by the Norton 650cc parallel-twin. Their CIMA stand also showcased a new RX850 adventure bike, powered by an enlarged 850cc iteration of the Norton twin. 

Zongshen-Showcases-Cyclone-RA9-V-Twin-Concept-3

Source: CycleWorld

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Aprilia, Moto Guzzi, Piaggio, And Vespa Will Be At EICMA 2021

The 78th edition of EICMA, arguably the biggest two-wheeler exhibition globally, is all set to take place between 23-28th November, later this year. Over the last few months, several manufacturers, including Honda, Yamaha, Triumph, Kymco, MV Agusta, Royal Enfield, and Benelli, have confirmed that they will be attending the event. Now, the Piaggio Group and the brands it entails – Aprilia, Moto Guzzi, Piaggio, And Vespa – have also confirmed their attendance to showcase their latest offerings.

Aprilia-Moto-Guzzi-Piaggio-And-Vespa-Will-Be-At-EICMA-2021-1

Earlier this month, Moto Guzzi celebrated turning a century old and announced plans for a redesigned factory in Mandello del Lario. The announcement also brought news of an all-new platform, the first product of which will be a V-twin motorcycle called the V100 Mandello. We expect the production motorcycle to be unveiled at EICMA 2021 and other 2022 models that the company has in store.

Moto-Guzzi-V100-Mandello

New-Peugeot-Metropolis-2

Last year, EICMA didn’t occur due to the pandemic, and manufacturers will undoubtedly be looking to showcase what they’ve been working on for the previous few months. RideApart mentions how this iteration of EICMA will feel much more special than usual, as it represents a comeback – for Italy and the motorcycle industry – after the devastating year that was 2020. We definitely agree and are incredibly excited about all the new motorcycles and tech we’ll witness in a few weeks.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Aprilia Launches New 2500cc GPR250R sportbike in China

Aprilia has decided to dip deeper into the world of small displacement bikes – and it looks like a mini-RSV4.

According to a report from MotoPinas, Aprilia just revealed the all-new GPR250R sportbike at the Xi’an Motor Expo in China on July 5. 

A side view of the new Aprilia GPR250R

The 250cc motorcycle will be competing against Honda’s CBR250R and the Yamaha R3 in the small displacement market, with the current reveal keeping the bike in China for the time being.

There have been whispers of the bike eventually making its way to Europe, though this has yet to be confirmed, and it is likely just speculation. 

A front view of the new Aprilia GPR250R

The GPR250R’s sporty exoskeleton and frame design was inspired by the Aprilia RSV4 and houses a similar air inlet system, underbelly exhaust, and LED taillights, along with a set of 17-inch tires.  

Being the proud owner of an R3, I can vouch that the power and torque appear to be more present in the Yammie bike – so let’s do some spec comparison. 

A view of the gas tank of the new Aprilia GPR250R

The GPR250R is powered by a single-cylinder 250cc engine and boasts a power output of 29ps at 9,000 rpm, while torque output maxes at 22nm at 7,500 rpm – all available through a 6-speed gearbox and slipper clutch. 

By contrast, the Yamaha R3 is powered by an inline twin-cylinder 321cc engine and boasts a power output of 42.0ps at 10,750 rpm, with torque output maxing out at 26.8 nm at 9,100 rpm. 

A front view of the new Aprilia GPR250R

Bottom line, it’s good to see Aprilia step up into a niche of bikes that are in increasing demand in the Eastern Hemisphere – question is if the bike will do just as well in the Central Hemisphere.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Akrapovič Has Two New Exhaust Options For 2021 Aprilia RS 660

One Street, One Track

It ain’t an Aprilia if it isn’t screaming like a MotoGP track bike… Right? Akrapovič – the industries leading exhaust manufacturer – has two full exhaust systems ready for the 2021 Aprilia RS 660 motorcycle.

The Racing Line (S-A6R2) is a carbon fiber exhaust that will rely on your stock ECU mapping (this is a major benefit; you will avoid the expensive tuning cost to have your motorcycle run properly with the new airflow metrics) with a 2.5 horsepower increase at 11,200 rpm and 2.7 lb-ft bump in torque at 4550. This exhaust will also shed a pound off the wet weight of your motorcycle.

S-A6R1 is the “track use” (haha) variant that aims to bring 3 horsepower and 5 lb-ft of torque while also shedding 2.5 pounds from the weight of your ride. This exhaust won’t keep your ride Euro 5 compliant, however.

Bitcoin

The official Akra website currently has no info regarding pricing or purchasing these exhaust systems, but I’m sure you can expect to find them through official dealers in the new year.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Piaggio Trademark of ESR1 Could Hint at Aprilia Electric Scooter

Built on the Vespa Elettrica Platform?

Piaggio Group owns a whole lot of companies, and electrification is certainly on the horizon for many of them. Recently, Piaggio trademarked the name eSR1 and that has me thinking an electric Aprilia SR scooter could be coming soon.

According to Motorcycle.com, the European Union Intellectual Property Office published a trademark application today that showed the logo eSR1 in a stylized font. The publication did note that the owner of the application was not revealed, but that it’s sure it’s Piaggio.

eSR1

The reason? The SR in the logo looks identical to the SR in the SR-GP Replica scooter that was released last year. There’s also the fact that the application was filed by Jacobacci & Partners S.P.A., which is an Italian law firm that handles Piaggio’s stuff regularly.

There are various SR scooter models from Aprilia at this point in various markets. Aprilia offers the scooter in displacements ranging from 50cc all the way up to 160cc. The speculation is that this new scooter would be a new SR based on the Vespa Elettrica platform. 

That would make sense, but Piaggio Group might have something special up its sleeve and have this new scooter offer better range or performance than the Vespa. Time will tell.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Spotted in Wild

Will The RSV4 Changes Resemble the New 660?

With the new Aprilia RS 660 being released and reviewed over the past few weeks, it was only a matter of time until we saw what the Italian manufacturer had in mind for the 2021 RSV4; the most highly regarded motorcycle in their lineup.

The new RS 660 showcased some new body styling that we have not seen the brand incorporates in the past. The new LED headlight assembly, new front end, new body lines; all led us to the puzzling question of “how is this going to translate to the RSV4? Is this a one-off design? Will Aprilia bring any of these design cues to the larger bikes in their lineup?”

The RS 660 is built around – literally – half of the RSV4 engine, taking the V4 configuration and chopping it in half to produce an inline 2 configuration. With such similar DNA, will the exterior of the bikes reflect the internal similarities? 

Norton

Instagrammer ‘Motomaniaci‘ took some sneaky photos of what looks to be the new 2021 RSV4, and you guessed correctly because it appears like the front end as well as the side fairings share a strong resemblance to its new little brother. 

The RSV4 and Tuono have been neglected on the design front for quite some time now, so it’s great to see Aprilia taking the introduction of their new motorcycle to bring some much-needed styling updates to the older models. The upcoming Tuono 660 may set the course for an updated Tuono V4 as well. Only time will tell.

These spy shots are all we have to go off of currently, and we’re going to have to wait for Aprilia to open the hatch on the official details of the new models when the time comes. 

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Motorcyclist Magazine Takes The 2021 Aprilia RS 660 For a Spin

Aprilia has a long history of producing large-displacement racebikes without much room for compromise when it comes to riders who want an affordable mid-displacement bike. This is where the RS 660 swoops in to save the day. The RS 660 was just introduced as a brand new bike for the Aprilia brand featuring a 659cc parallel-twin engine (with design elements taken from their world-famous RSV4 engine) that produces 100 horsepower and 49.4 lb-ft of torque.

Motorcyclist magazine essentially pioneered the ‘MC Commute’ video style, with their previous hosts, Zach and Ahri; and since their departure from the company have continued the MC Commute series on their Youtube channel to keep the information flowing for riders seeing details about new motorcycles put into actual practice.

In this video, the RS 660 is put through its paces from the perspective of an every-day rider to see if it is something that is worth your time. Adam Waheed – the reviewer – mentions that this motorcycle lacks a bit of power and prefers to ride it in the ‘highest power’ rider mode setting though, but the torque is still great due to the fact that you’re riding on half of an RSV4 engine.

The bike comes with traction control, wheelie control, engine braking control, cruise control ABS, etc.; but Adam mentions the TC system is perhaps not even a worth feature of this bike as it barely makes enough power to break the rear loose.

Overall, the RS 660 leaves a good impression on Adam, and you really can’t go wrong with this motorcycle if you’re looking for an affordable motorcycle that’s easy to ride through the city.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

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