Tag Archives: Aprilia

Akrapovič Has Two New Exhaust Options For 2021 Aprilia RS 660

One Street, One Track

It ain’t an Aprilia if it isn’t screaming like a MotoGP track bike… Right? Akrapovič – the industries leading exhaust manufacturer – has two full exhaust systems ready for the 2021 Aprilia RS 660 motorcycle.

The Racing Line (S-A6R2) is a carbon fiber exhaust that will rely on your stock ECU mapping (this is a major benefit; you will avoid the expensive tuning cost to have your motorcycle run properly with the new airflow metrics) with a 2.5 horsepower increase at 11,200 rpm and 2.7 lb-ft bump in torque at 4550. This exhaust will also shed a pound off the wet weight of your motorcycle.

S-A6R1 is the “track use” (haha) variant that aims to bring 3 horsepower and 5 lb-ft of torque while also shedding 2.5 pounds from the weight of your ride. This exhaust won’t keep your ride Euro 5 compliant, however.

Bitcoin

The official Akra website currently has no info regarding pricing or purchasing these exhaust systems, but I’m sure you can expect to find them through official dealers in the new year.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Piaggio Trademark of ESR1 Could Hint at Aprilia Electric Scooter

Built on the Vespa Elettrica Platform?

Piaggio Group owns a whole lot of companies, and electrification is certainly on the horizon for many of them. Recently, Piaggio trademarked the name eSR1 and that has me thinking an electric Aprilia SR scooter could be coming soon.

According to Motorcycle.com, the European Union Intellectual Property Office published a trademark application today that showed the logo eSR1 in a stylized font. The publication did note that the owner of the application was not revealed, but that it’s sure it’s Piaggio.

eSR1

The reason? The SR in the logo looks identical to the SR in the SR-GP Replica scooter that was released last year. There’s also the fact that the application was filed by Jacobacci & Partners S.P.A., which is an Italian law firm that handles Piaggio’s stuff regularly.

There are various SR scooter models from Aprilia at this point in various markets. Aprilia offers the scooter in displacements ranging from 50cc all the way up to 160cc. The speculation is that this new scooter would be a new SR based on the Vespa Elettrica platform. 

That would make sense, but Piaggio Group might have something special up its sleeve and have this new scooter offer better range or performance than the Vespa. Time will tell.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

2021 Aprilia RSV4 Spotted in Wild

Will The RSV4 Changes Resemble the New 660?

With the new Aprilia RS 660 being released and reviewed over the past few weeks, it was only a matter of time until we saw what the Italian manufacturer had in mind for the 2021 RSV4; the most highly regarded motorcycle in their lineup.

The new RS 660 showcased some new body styling that we have not seen the brand incorporates in the past. The new LED headlight assembly, new front end, new body lines; all led us to the puzzling question of “how is this going to translate to the RSV4? Is this a one-off design? Will Aprilia bring any of these design cues to the larger bikes in their lineup?”

The RS 660 is built around – literally – half of the RSV4 engine, taking the V4 configuration and chopping it in half to produce an inline 2 configuration. With such similar DNA, will the exterior of the bikes reflect the internal similarities? 

Norton

Instagrammer ‘Motomaniaci‘ took some sneaky photos of what looks to be the new 2021 RSV4, and you guessed correctly because it appears like the front end as well as the side fairings share a strong resemblance to its new little brother. 

The RSV4 and Tuono have been neglected on the design front for quite some time now, so it’s great to see Aprilia taking the introduction of their new motorcycle to bring some much-needed styling updates to the older models. The upcoming Tuono 660 may set the course for an updated Tuono V4 as well. Only time will tell.

These spy shots are all we have to go off of currently, and we’re going to have to wait for Aprilia to open the hatch on the official details of the new models when the time comes. 

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Motorcyclist Magazine Takes The 2021 Aprilia RS 660 For a Spin

Aprilia has a long history of producing large-displacement racebikes without much room for compromise when it comes to riders who want an affordable mid-displacement bike. This is where the RS 660 swoops in to save the day. The RS 660 was just introduced as a brand new bike for the Aprilia brand featuring a 659cc parallel-twin engine (with design elements taken from their world-famous RSV4 engine) that produces 100 horsepower and 49.4 lb-ft of torque.

Motorcyclist magazine essentially pioneered the ‘MC Commute’ video style, with their previous hosts, Zach and Ahri; and since their departure from the company have continued the MC Commute series on their Youtube channel to keep the information flowing for riders seeing details about new motorcycles put into actual practice.

In this video, the RS 660 is put through its paces from the perspective of an every-day rider to see if it is something that is worth your time. Adam Waheed – the reviewer – mentions that this motorcycle lacks a bit of power and prefers to ride it in the ‘highest power’ rider mode setting though, but the torque is still great due to the fact that you’re riding on half of an RSV4 engine.

The bike comes with traction control, wheelie control, engine braking control, cruise control ABS, etc.; but Adam mentions the TC system is perhaps not even a worth feature of this bike as it barely makes enough power to break the rear loose.

Overall, the RS 660 leaves a good impression on Adam, and you really can’t go wrong with this motorcycle if you’re looking for an affordable motorcycle that’s easy to ride through the city.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Piaggio Group Is Delivering Their Italian Motorcycles and Scooters Straight to Your Door

Order an Aprilia RSV4 Straight to Your Doorstep

Knock knock – Who’s there? It’s the second wave of the COVID-19 outbreak. The world has been seeing a steady rise in new cases across the board. My hometown didn’t have a terrible initial outbreak, but the news is showing cases skyrocketing due to cold weather and Halloween parties.

Italy had one of the first initial waves on earth, and are taking every possible opportunity to make sure that doesn’t happen this second time around. Ten days ago, the government imposed curfews and the country just divided itself into areas based on COVID cases with a colour assigned to indicate risk levels. Motorcycle dealerships and gear stores remain open, even in the highest risk areas.

If you don’t fancy braving the outside world to go pick up your new bike to help burn some free time during a second lockdown, the Piaggio Group has you covered. If you buy a new bike or scooter on their website they now offer an additional service that gives you the option to have your new vehicle delivered right to your doorstep. 

Piaggio, Vespa, Aprilia and Moto Guzzi’s websites will all have the option to have your new purchase delivered. Although you might initially think that keeping dealerships open in the ‘red zones’ is a bad idea, keep in mind much of Italy’s residents fully commute by motorcycle or moped, so it is important for the brands to keep their servicing centers open in the event a customer needs a tune-up or major repair to keep them mobile during the pandemic. 

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

2021 Aprilia RS660 Review | Motorcycle Test

Aprilia RS660 Test by Adam Child

We’re told the supersport market is dead, and yes, sales show a monumental decline in this class over the last two decades, but these exciting, dedicated track bikes are simply that, race bikes, with high revving engines and radical riding positions that can be hard work for everyday use on the road. But despite its supersport styling, Aprilia’s RS660 wasn’t designed for the track; this is a comfortable and unintimidating road bike with a typically Aprilia sporting edge.

2021 Aprilia RS660 Review

The RS660 is powered by a parallel twin with a 270-degree crank, which is essentially the front half of the RSV4. But although the RS660 is an ‘entry-level’ bike for Aprilia, and is designed for a young and inexperienced audience, it’s neither bland nor dull – the opposite in fact – and sports even more rider aids than Aprilia’s flagship superbike RSV4. Cornering ABS, multiple track and rider modes, traction and wheel control, an up-and-down quick-shifter, even cruise control make for a world class array of electronic aids on a 100 horsepower sub $20,000 bike.

Does it handle?

It has a short wheelbase at just 169 kg dry or 183 kg with fuel it is light, there’s adjustable suspension, a wide 180-section rear hoop, and that purple and red colour scheme is somewhat reminiscent of the legendary two-stroke RS250. If you don’t know what that is ask a grown up.

The seat has some padding, the bars are relatively high and wide, the ergonomics are comfortable and the pegs are relatively low. Not what I was expecting. The parallel twin is a road bike first and foremost, but one that can also be taken to the track.

2021 Aprilia RS660 Review

The steering is light, which is exaggerated by the wide bars. It’s fun, yet stable, giving you the option to steer into the corner, or hang off the inside, knee on the deck. It is user friendly and welcoming, you just jump on and ride, safe in the knowledge you have excellent rider aids at hand, should you get in a little too hot.

Kayaba 43 mm forks are fully adjustable and were flawless on the road test. The rear unit is also adjustable (aside from compression), and even at a sharp road pace is hard to fault. Arguably it doesn’t have the plush ‘top-level’ feel of quality Öhlins units or similar and I’m sure you’ll need a little more support on track with race tyres. But, overall, it’s an easy handling road bike. I’m sure a more purpose track version will be coming soon……

Standard radial Brembo stoppers with braided lines and radial master cylinder are more than up for the job, especially when you consider the bike’s lack of weight. When stopping 183 kg from a top speed of around 230 km/h, you don’t need the most expensive race-spec Brembo stoppers. The feel is excellent, even the back brake, and the cornering ABS isn’t intrusive on the road.

Interestingly, you have three levels of ABS. The most intrusive is cornering ABS front and rear, mode two is similar but less intrusive, and mode one is conventional ABS on the front, not cornering ABS and no ABS on the rear, which in experienced hands with the standard slipper clutch allows you back into corners for fun.

2021 Aprilia RS660 Review
Is it quick?

What Aprilia has done is essentially use their RSV4 as a base, chopping the V4 engine in half to produce a parallel twin. The bore size is the same as the RSV4 1100, but the stroke is up to 63.93 mm, not the 52.3 mm of the V-Four.

The twin-cylinder DOHC engine produces a respectable 100 horsepower at 10,500 rpm and 67 Nm at 8500 rpm, that is more torque than a Yamaha R6 or Honda CBR650R. The little twin will bounce off the rev limiter at 11,500 rpm but with a race kit will rev on for another 1000 rpm. But this isn’t a race engine; 80 per cent of the torque is available from as low as 4000rpm, and 90 per cent of the twist is available from 6250rpm.

You don’t simply magically cut the V4 in half. There’s a new clutch, a new intake system, a new cylinder head, new 48 mm throttle bodies… this is an entirely new engine, albeit one that leans on the experience and knowledge gained from the V4. Aprilia has made the engine run smoother, with a new counter-weighted 270-degree crankshaft. The engine is a structural part of the bike, too, the swing-arm bolts directly to the rear of the crankcases.

2021 Aprilia RS660 Review

The 270-degree crank gives the RS660 a distinctive exhaust tone, very much like a slow revving RSV4. It doesn’t sound like a Kawasaki Z650 (with its 180-degree crank), the Aprilia is much smoother. The light, one-piece, 6.2 kg exhaust consists of one silencer per cylinder plus a cat’ exhaust/collector box, which then exits on either side of the rear tyre. The two jutting exhausts not only gives the 660 a rare sound but also a distinguishing symmetrical look. A tickle of the ride-by-wire throttle allows the revs to dart up the full colour TFT digital dash. The revs build fluently, quicker than I was expecting, and for a standard exhaust, the system adds a little spirit to the RS660 experience.

There are five riding modes to opt from: three for the road – Commute, Dynamic and Individual – and two for the track – Challenge and Track Attack. Each mode changes the engine character, feeling and the multiple rider aids, including traction and wheelie control, cornering ABS, engine brake assist, while the-up-and-down quick-shifter which comes as standard is the same in all modes. Again, you can change and personalise each mode if you wish. It’s simple and intuitive, the new switchgear makes it easier than ever.

To start I opted for the commute mode, with the fuelling set to three, the kindest setting. The fuelling was perfect. Aprilia has a world-class fuelling team, throttle response is always perfect, which is particularly impressive for a parallel twin. Again, like the premium RSV4 1100, the quick-shifter is perfect too, both up and down.

2021 Aprilia RS660 Review

As we headed into the Alps it was time to flick from Commute mode to Dynamic, which automatically changes the engine character and response, and lessens the intrusion of rider aids. The response is a little sharper, especially from a closed to an open throttle. It’s not snatchy, the fuelling is again excellent. Power is relatively linear and you can short-shift on the rapid quick-shifter and still make progress.

There’s a little boost around 7500 rpm, and the modest twin loves to rev to the limiter at 11,500 rpm. It’s so entertaining to thrash, tapping up and down the quick-shifter with the clutch redundant, excellent rider aids and cornering ABS on hand if the road surface should unexpectedly change.

Then, for sheer (and immature) amusement, I switched into the Individual mode, which I’d previously pre-set for no traction control, no anti-wheelie, power on the most aggressive mode, engine braking down to one, and ABS set to one, which means only conventional ABS on the front, not cornering ABS and no ABS on the rear.

2021 Aprilia RS660 Review

The RS660 will wheelie in the first two gears with some encouragement from the clutch. It’s a great engine to stir, and thankfully, when you look down at the full colour TFT dash, you’re not doubling the speed limit and facing a jail sentence. The RS660 is reasonably quick, I’d estimate top speed is around 230 km/h, but unlike a RSV4 it’s not scary on the road, dare we say even practical.

The new parallel twin is frugal on fuel. Aprilia quote 4.89l-100km, but on a steady ride in the afternoon I managed 4.15l-100km, which gives a possible tank range (15L tank) of over 321km. Four hours in the saddle wouldn’t be heartbreak either, because the ergonomics are roomy for this type of bike, with pegs lower than the RSV4 and the bars that are wide.

The bodywork is also impressive; the screen is almost a double bubble TT style screen, making it straightforward to get tucked in at speed, and at motorway cruising speeds does a half-decent job of wind protection.

120 km/h equates to around 6000 rpm and, while there are a few vibrations felt from the pegs and a little from the bar ends as the speed and revs increase, it’s nothing unpleasant. Aprilia even offers a tail pack and a tank bag as optional extras, and I’d happily take on some serious miles on the RS660 and even use the cruise control.

2021 Aprilia RS660 Review
Gadgets to keep the youngsters happy

Rider aids aren’t really needed on a 100 horsepower middleweight already furnished with a first-rate chassis and tyres. But you have to remember the young audience which Aprilia is attracting, and for more experienced riders they can to de-activated even on the move.

At your finger tips are multiple rider modes, eight-stage traction control, wheelie control, engine brake assist plus cornering ABS and conventional ABS. Additionally, you have cruise control and an up-and-down quick-shifter. The modes are straightforward to change on the fly, and you can even de-active the traction and wheelie control.

The array of rider aids is impressive, but I favor the thumb and finger traction control toggle switches on the RSV4 Factory. Furthermore, the RS’s rider aids aren’t displayed on the main menu whilst riding. The rider modes are clear but you can’t, for example, glance down and see how much TC you’re running – that info is within a sub-menu.

Got to let a twin sing….

There are the typical accessories from Akrapovic, including a full exhaust. There is also additional software available which means you can flick over to a race shift, and have access to a pit lane limiter. Away from the racetrack, there is a comfortable seat, USB socket, luggage… even a larger fairing and Bluetooth connectivity.

Yep, you could probably tour on it too…
2020 Aprilia RS660 Verdict

I’m impressed with Aprilia’s new RS660. A usable, friendly, road-going sports bike overloaded with rider aids and just about affordable, just. The versatile engine that should not get you into too much difficulty and there is the safety net of top level rider aids.

It sounds great, has character, is eye-catching, and is desirable.

Aprilia has possibly gone a little overboard on the rider aids, and the suspension may need an upgrade for some serious racing/track action – but I’m sure there will be a sportier version in the pipeline soon. I can wait to try it on track. A multitalented, entertaining, attractive bike for the inexperienced and experienced alike – top work Aprilia

2021 Aprilia RS660 Review

Aprilia RS660 Specifications

Aprilia RS660 Specifications
Engine 659 cc four-stroke, parallel-twin, 270-degree
Bore x Stroke 81 x 63.93 mm
Compression Ratio 13.5:1
Claimed Power 100 hp (73.5 kW) at 10,500 rpm
Claimed Torque 67 Nm at 8500 rpm
Induction 2 x 48 mm EFI throttle bodies. RbW
Gears Six, AQS Aprilia Quick Shift
Clutch Wet, multi-plate, slipper
Frame Aluminium dual beam chassis with removable seat support subframe
Forks Kayaba 41-mm forks, aluminium radial calliper mounting bracket. Adjustable spring preload and rebound damping. 120 mm wheel travel.
Shock Aluminium asymmetric swingarm. Adjustable monoshock in spring reload, rebound. 130 mm wheel travel.
Tyres 120/70-17 (F), 180/55-17 (R)
Front Brakes Front ABS: double disc, diameter 320 mm, Brembo radial callipers with four Ø32-mm opposing pistons. Radial pump and metal braided brake hose.
Rear Brake Ø220-mm disc; Brembo calliper with two Ø34-mm separate pistons. Pump with integrated tank and metal braided hose
Electronics Six-axis inertial platform, APRC package containing ATC (traction control), AWC (wheelie control), AEB (engine braking), AEM (engine maps) and ACC (cruise control). 5 Riding modes (Road and Track, 3 fixed and 2 customisable)
Instrumentation Full-colour TFT
Dry Weight 169 kg (TBC)
Kerb Weight 183 kg (TBC)
Seat Height 815 mm (TBC)
Wheelbase 1370 mm
Rake / Trail 24.1 degrees / 104.6 mm
Fuel Capacity 15 litres
Service Intervals /
Warranty /
Available March-April 2021
Price Approx $18,500 to $19,000 Ride Away TBC
2021 Aprilia RS660 Review

Aprilia RS660 Images

Source: MCNews.com.au

Aprilia RS 660 Debut at Laguna Seca

The Rs 660 Finally Shows up to the Party

If you’ve you’re a fan of Italian motorcycles but are intimidated or have no use for a literbike, the Aprilia brand has pretty off-limits with producing mid-displacement motorcycles – especially ones with that of a sport-bike form. Sure, you have the Mana 850, Shiver 750 and Dosoduro 750; but all these bikes have one thing in common… None of them feature your typical street-bike (crotch rocket) styling and design.

Yamaha has the smaller R6 to their R1, Honda has the CBR 600RR as a smaller option to their 1000RR etc. Aprilia finally hits the market with their agile 600cc class sportbike and have decided to host the official unveiling on the Westcoast of USA at none other than the legendary Laguna Seca race track.

Aprilia has teamed up with Rennie Scaysbrook to be their official demo rider, an Aussie racer who took the Aprilia Tuono V4 on a victory run at the infamous Hillclimb of Pikes Peak.

The brand unveiled a new colour option for the motorcycle at the event in addition to the full-speed race demo to display the capabilities of the motorcycle.

The new ‘Acid Gold’ colour scheme available for the RS 660

The new RS 660 is a 4100 pound, two-cylinder, 100HP “full-fairing sport bike with semi-handlebar that exploits the dynamic qualities of perfect chassis architecture“, as their official release states.

2017 Honda Grom stars

Currently paired along with their Europian press launch – as of yesterday – those of you in europian markets are welcomed to prebook online and order the new RS 660 from the official Aprilia website.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Aprilia Is Working on a Sub-300cc Model for India

Piaggio Expanding in India

Aprilia will put out a sub-300cc motorcycle for the Indian market.

This news comes from the mouth of Piaggio India managing director and chairman Diego Graffi. In a recent interview he did with Money Control, he said Aprila wants to get into the 250cc to 300cc segment in India in the next three years. 

This is a little different from the things he as said in the past, though not completely. He told the world that Aprilia is working on a 300cc to 400cc motorcycle for the Indian market at the Vespa Racing Sixties launch in India in September.

That was the first major move. Now he says 250cc to 300cc, which is a step down in displacement but makes plenty of sense for the Indian market.

“We are … looking at a higher 250-300cc segment. In the next three years, the Indian market will see a motorcycle under the Aprilia brand. We are taking our time because we want to be coherent with our mission and profile, which is to be different and premium and deliver a performance which is not seen in that segment. All this takes time, but the product will come,” Graffi told Money Control.

2017 Honda Grom stars

It will be interesting to see what comes of this. I doubt the little bike will make it outside of India, but the more money Aprilia is making in the country, the more money it will have to build higher displacement bikes for global sale.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Aprilia Australia Confirmed RS 660 Arrival Date and Price Range

Aprilia’s Middle-Displacement Sportbike Is Almost Here

The Aprilia RS660 is a hotly anticipated motorcycle for just about any market out there. In Australia, Aprilia has now said when the model will arrive and roughly what it will cost. 

The motorcycle will get official pricing a little closer to arrival, but when those numbers do come in, they should be between $18,500 and $19,00 AUS. The motorcycle will arrive on Australian shores in March of 2021, so you have a bit of a wait before you need to round up your cash or your financing. The price listed above will be inclusive of GST and on-road costs.

What’s interesting is the fact that after the RS660 arrives, Aprilia will likely be hard at work coming out with other middleweight machines.

According to Motorcycle News Australia, there will be a Tuareg adventure bike and a Streetfighter both based on the RS660 platform that will come soon after. How soon, though, is still up in the air.

I knew about the Taureg adventure bike the but I’d only heard rumors of the Streetfighter bike. The fact that the publication lists it like its a sure thing, gets me excited. Time will tell how long Aprilia will take to get those bikes ready.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

Aprilia RS660 full specs and details

Aprilia RS660

Aprilia RS660

Resting on an all-new technical basis and defined by the brand-new 100-bhp 660cc parallel-twin engine, a new generation of lightweight yet high-performance bikes is born, featuring sophisticated design and cutting edge technology.

Aprilia RS660

After the arrival of the RS660 sportsbike in April 2021, we can expect an off-road Tuareg and Streetfighter versions based on this platform to follow in due course. It is fair to expect that this machine will be pitched into a higher price bracket than most middleweight machines.

Aprilia RS660

The RS 660 offers first-rate technical content, honed from Aprilia’s competition racing experience, made available for street-riding fun. A perfect formula for maximum enjoyment, at a slender wet weight of 183 kilos, featuring a package of APRC electronic rider aids that would be at home even in superior classes.

Aprilia RS660

The main features of the fairings speak typical Aprilia sporting parlance, and are characterized by a triple LED headlight assembly, equipped with perimeter Daytime Running Lights positioned around the two main headlights, making the RS 660 immediately distinguishable in any lighting conditions.

Aprilia RS660

Direction indicators are integrated into the DRL profiles making the front end even more compact. The lighting system is equipped with several features to make riding even safer: thanks to the presence of a twilight sensor, the dipped beams are switched on automatically, while the self-cancelling turn indicators flash in the event of emergency braking. Finally, thanks to the cornering lights function, a pair of additional headlights in the parabolas illuminate the inside of the curve, increasing visibility when taking bends.

Aprilia RS660

The seat-footpeg-handlebar triangulation welcomes riders of all stature, according to Aprilia, offering comfort and spaciousness, with a posture that is neither heavily-loaded onto the handlebars, nor with legs excessively bent due to highly-placed foot-rests.

Aprilia RS660

Aprilia claim that the seat features very comfortable padding and is tapered at the sides to facilitate the resting of the feet on the ground which allows easy manoeuvres from a stationary position. A pillion pad is positioned on the tail while a single-seat tail comes as an optional extra.

Aprilia RS660

The 15-litre capacity petrol tank is designed to enhances the compactness.

Aprilia RS660

In the traditional vein of Aprilia sports models, the RS 660 has also been designed to facilitate the fast, easy removal of any surplus elements when used on the track, such as mirrors, passenger footrests and license plate holders.

Aprilia RS660

The frame and swingarm are both die-cast aluminium, featuring unique characteristics within their class. The chassis dimensions favour agility: thanks to its 1370 mm wheelbase and the 24.1° inclination of the steering head, the RS 660 boasts exceptional handling capabilities, combined with all the precise features and sensations that characterise the front end of classic Noale-produced motorcycles.

Aprilia RS660

The frame is made up of twin lateral beams bolted into the steering head area and, to the rear; the engine is maximized as a load-bearing element and contributes to forming a compact, lightweight yet rigid structure. In order to make the frame even lighter and more essential, the swingarm is pivoted directly into the engine: this is a monobloc element characterized by its considerable length, useful for having optimum traction and asymmetrical arms – a typical technical choice in the history of the Aprilia RS. The particular mounting of the adjustable shock absorber allows for excellent progression even without the insertion of any linkage, thus reducing even more precious weight.

Aprilia RS660

In designing the frame, Aprilia designers paid particular attention to the area of ​​the steering head to ensure the necessary sturdiness for both road and track use, while keeping the turn radius very low to facilitate everyday riding use.

Aprilia RS660

The chassis is completed by an adjustable Kayaba fork with 41 mm upside-down stems and a braking system made up of, a pair of 320 mm diameter steel discs, at the front and a pair of radial mount calipers and a radial master cylinder on the handlebars both manufactured by Brembo.

Aprilia RS660

This is a 660 cc parallel-twin cylinder unit, a highly compact latest-generation engine derived from the 1100 cc front-banked V4, whose line it follows in both concept and measurements and sports a Euro 5 homologation.

Aprilia RS660

This configuration was chosen for its compactness and lightness. An engine with reduced horizontal and lateral dimensions allows great design freedom both for the arrangement of fundamental parts such as the intake and exhaust. As far as the chassis is concerned, the engine also features load-bearing functions, while housing the swingarm to its rear.

Aprilia RS660

The front-leaning configuration affords the rider more comfort, thanks to the greater heat dissipation and leaves the designers plenty of freedom to exploit the space. Furthermore, the engineering lends itself to superior cooling, helped also by the ingenious double-walled fairing system which aims at accelerating the air flows passing through it. With the same objective in mind, long exhaust manifolds were engineered to funnel flows into a single-piece tailpipe with a asymmetrical split outlet, all fully positioned beneath the engine, with the added advantage of superior weight distribution and a lower centre of gravity.

Aprilia RS660

The new Aprilia twin-cylinder is the result of experience gained developing the extremely powerful engine that equips the RSV4 and is therefore based on a background of highly efficient and technical trials: the cylinder head, combustion chambers, ducts, cylinders and pistons all derive from the V4. Likewise, it features an 81 mm bore – as in the 1078 cc V4 – with a 63.9 mm stroke. The decision to take advantage of the V4 technology guarantees top-class performance, while taking into consideration the high piston stroke speeds relative to its displacement size. Naturally, all engine components, including castings and molds, have all been designed and developed from the ground up.

Aprilia RS660

The new engine has the crankcase split horizontally into two pieces with the cylinders integrated into the upper crankcase to reduce overall dimensions to render the structure more robust. The cylinders are offset from the crankshaft to minimize internal friction during piston thrusts.

The hollowed camshafts of the 4-valve-per-cylinder twin-shaft are side chain driven. The mechanically operated oil bath multi disc clutch has a built-in assist and slipper system. Wet sump lubrication involves an oil sump protruding downwards and crafted around the intake port, in order to best gather the lubricant in every type of riding phase, even when the bike is at its maximum inclination or during periods of braking and acceleration.

Aprilia RS660

For a parallel-twin of this displacement, the performance obtained is impressive and comparable to that of a much higher cubic capacity two-cylinder: 100 hp at 10,500 rpm, with an extension capacity that allows the limiter to be moved up to its 11,500 rpm threshold. The maximum 67 Nm torque is offered at 8,500 rpm, with 80% of the torque available from 4,000 rpm, and 90% at 6,250 rpm.

In addition to performance and lightness, another aim of the project was to obtain from the engine the same character and grit typical of V-twin cylinders. To this end, valve timing with connecting rod pins arranged at 270° were chosen. Combustion is thus asymmetrical and offset by 270° to obtain irregular bursts which perform and sound similar to a V-twin. Furthermore, this type of configuration allows, by means of a single countershaft, easy balancing of the alternating forces of first and second order.

Aprilia RS660

The injection system includes a duo of 48 mm-diameter throttle bodies, with intake ducts of varying lengths to optimize delivery at high and medium speeds.

The performance of the new engine is guaranteed by electronics directly loaned from the Aprilia V4, including Ride-by-Wire with multi-mapping, an electronic accelerator, for the subtle management of subtle, yet progressive acceleration, even at low revs and optimal consumption.

The RS 660 is equipped with a six-axis inertial platform which, thanks to the built-in accelerometers and gyroscopes, is able to recognize the condition of the bike with respect to the road; it records and processes inputs deriving from the rider and sends the data to the control unit which intervenes seamlessly in the control parameters.

Aprilia RS660

– ATC: Aprilia Traction Control, adjustable traction control characterized by fine and high-performance intervention logics

– AWC: Aprilia Wheelie Control, adjustable wheelie control system.

– ACC: Aprilia Cruise Control, maintains the set speed without using the throttle control.

– AQS: Aprilia Quick Shift, the electronic gearbox, for high-speed changes without easing off the throttle or without using the clutch, also equipped with a downshift function which allows downshifting without touching the clutch. Thanks to the software offered among the original accessories it is possible to reverse the gearbox for track use without the need to replace components.

– AEB: Aprilia Engine Brake, the adjustable engine brake control system for the deceleration phase.

– AEM: Aprilia Engine Map, various forms of mappings available to change the character and the way engine power is delivered.

Aprilia RS660

The Aprilia RS 660 adopts the advanced multi-map Cornering ABS, to ensure maximum safety on the road, without detracting from its sporting performance. The system, with extremely low weight and dimensions, is able to optimize braking and ABS intervention when cornering, thanks to a special algorithm which constantly monitors various parameters such as lateral acceleration, the pressure exerted on the front brake lever, the angles of lean, pitch and yaw, modulating the action of the brakes for an optimized combination of deceleration and stability.

Aprilia RS660

Aprilia has developed five Riding Modes, not merely to maximize the riding experience in different riding conditions, but also to simplify life on board. Riders are only required to choose which Riding Mode best suits their needs to automatically obtain the best set-up regarding traction control, wheelie control, engine braking, ABS and the other tweakable parameters.

There are three Riding Modes for road use:

Commute, for everyday riding;

Dynamic, for sports riding on the road

Individual, which allows for complete customization of electronic controls.

There are two Riding Modes designed for on-track use:

Challenge, suitable for on-track racing sessions capitalizing on the full potential of the RS 660

Time Attack, a system that allows more adept riders to fully tweak the electronic setup.

Aprilia RS660

Electronic settings are easily managed by a user-friendly four-button control on the left-side electric switch block with quick commands for managing cruise control and traction control.

Aprilia RS660

The full-colour TFT dash boasts exceptional display capabilities for its various parameters. The two selectable Road or Track screens (both with automatic night or day backlighting thanks to the twilight sensor) correspond to the same number of indices represented.

A further option is the Aprilia MIA, Aprilia’s multimedia platform that allows you to connect your smartphone to the bike extending yet more the range of instrumentation functions. The Aprilia MIA system offers a connection protocol that minimizes smartphone battery consumption and includes both the infotainment system for managing voice commands, calls and music via intuitive controls located on the handlebars and the navigation function. It is thus possible – once the destination has been entered into the smartphone – to view the directions directly on the dashboard. The Aprilia MIA app also allows any routes travelled to be recorded and the data, which is gathered by means of the geo-referenced telemetry function, can subsequently be analysed directly in the app.

Aprilia RS660

The Aprilia RS 660 colour range features the funky new Acid Gold, which most suitably reflects the dynamic, young character of the RS 660, enhancing even more the design features of the new Aprilia.

The Aprilia RS 660 is available in two other graphic variations: Lava Red is clearly dominated by colours that hark back to Aprilia’s great sporting heritage. The combination of purple and red is a tribute to the RS 250 in the 1994 Reggiani Replica version, the last true sports bike of the two-stroke engine era, still cherished by motorcyclists and highly sought after by collectors. The second, an Apex Black graphic is characterized by a total black look, which has also long since become part of Aprilia’s sporting history, which help the multiple bright red references to stand out considerably.

Aprilia RS660

Aprilia RS660 Specifications

Aprilia RS660 Specifications
Engine 659 cc four-stroke, parallel-twin, 270-degree
Bore x Stroke 81 x 63.93 mm
Compression Ratio 13.5:1
Claimed Power 100 hp (73.5 kW) at 10,500 rpm
Claimed Torque 67 Nm at 8500 rpm
Induction 2 x 48 mm EFI throttle bodies. RbW
Gears Six, AQS Aprilia Quick Shift
Clutch Wet, multi-plate, slipper
Frame Aluminium dual beam chassis with removable seat support subframe
Forks Kayaba 41-mm forks, aluminium radial calliper mounting bracket. Adjustable spring preload and rebound damping. 120 mm wheel travel.
Shock Aluminium asymmetric swingarm. Adjustable monoshock in spring reload, rebound. 130 mm wheel travel.
Tyres 120/70-17 (F), 180/55-17 (R)
Front Brakes Front ABS: double disc, diameter 320 mm, Brembo radial callipers with four Ø32-mm opposing pistons. Radial pump and metal braided brake hose.
Rear Brake Ø220-mm disc; Brembo calliper with two Ø34-mm separate pistons. Pump with integrated tank and metal braided hose
Electronics Six-axis inertial platform, APRC package containing ATC (traction control), AWC (wheelie control), AEB (engine braking), AEM (engine maps) and ACC (cruise control). 5 Riding modes (Road and Track, 3 fixed and 2 customisable)
Instrumentation Full-colour TFT
Dry Weight 169 kg (TBC)
Kerb Weight 183 kg (TBC)
Seat Height 815 mm (TBC)
Wheelbase 1370 mm
Rake / Trail 24.1 degrees / 104.6 mm
Fuel Capacity 15 litres
Service Intervals /
Warranty /
Available March-April 2021
Price TBA

Aprilia RS660 Images

Source: MCNews.com.au