Narrow lanes would promote riding

Rather than making roads wider, new research shows that adding more narrower lanes to existing roads would not only aid traffic flow but also promote more motorcycles and scooters.

University of Melbourne professor Chair of Statistics and motorbike rider Prof Richard Huggins says the plan has some merit.

The Grattan Institute suggests narrow lanes would reward motorists in smaller cars and on powered two wheelers and encourage people to ditch big SUVs in the city.

Melbourne City Council’s future transport strategy has picked up on the idea which has been welcomed by the Victorian Motorcycle Council.

VMC media spokesman John Eacott says altering road design to include narrow lanes dedicated to small traffic such as micro and light cars and motorbikes would have a beneficial effect on congestion.

Prof Huggins says it would be a good idea “at least in Melbourne”.

Melbourne roads lane filtering more often congestion promote
Melbourne traffic

“It would make the last bit of people’s commute much easier and safer,” he says.

“We had a very informal chat with City of Melbourne a few years ago about something similar (back then a narrow lane for single track vehicles) but as there were no regulations to cover such a lane it didn’t get to square one.”

Promote small cars and bikes

The Grattan Institute report says Australian cars are getting wider.

In the early 2000s, Aussie motorists started ditching their large sedans for hatchbacks.

However, in the past decade or more, they have swung over to SUVs and pick-ups which are much wider.

The report claims these wide vehicles are causing congestion because they limit visibility and intimidate other drivers.

They say adding a narrow lane would encourage motorists to switch to smaller cars and motorcycles and increase the capacity of roads to carry traffic.

Of course, a simple solution would be to allow motorcycles to use bus lanes and bike lanes. (Motorcycles are allowed to use bus lanes only in NSW, ACT and some Melbourne streets on a trial basis.)

But there is another result which the safety Nazis will just love.

Narrow lanes would force drivers to be more cautious and slow down.Commute traffic lane filtering speed wet NSW sydney police commuting slow speeding speed limit

The Grattan Institute also suggested in 2017 that a congestion tax should be introduced in Sydney and Melbourne during peak hours within five years.

That is another suggestion that Melbourne City Council has embraced. Click here to read more.

Source: MotorbikeWriter.com

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