Moto News | International Six Days of Enduro postponed till 2021

Moto News Weekly for March 31, 2020

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What happened this week

  • FIM ISDE & FIM Enduro Vintage Trophy postponed until 2021
  • Penrite Honda throw down the gauntlet – Off-Road Tyre Change Challenge
  • Jorge Casales fifth in shortened X-Trial World Championship
  • Kirk Gibbs talks the 2020 MX1 NZ Motocross Championship
  • Billy Bolt talks winning the 2020 SuperEnduro World Championship
  • Cory Texter shares American Flat Track 2020 aspirations
  • Andrew Short talks joining Yamaha Rally Official Team
  • Toni Bou keeps rolling on two wheels at home
  • Penrite Oils Honda Racing Team reveal MX Nats 2.0 livery
  • FIM postpone 2020 Speedway of Nations
  • 2020 Championship Calendars (Updated)
    • 2020 MXGP
    • 2020 Motocross of European Nations
    • 2020 Monster Energy AMA Supercross
    • 2020 AMA Supermoto National Championship
    • 2020 American Flat Track
    • 2020 Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship
    • 2020 WESS Enduro World Championship

FIM ISDE & FIM Enduro Vintage Trophy postponed until 2021

Following discussions between the FIM, FMI and the local organising committee of the 2020 FIM International Six Days of Enduro (ISDE) and the FIM Enduro Vintage Trophy (EVT) in relation to the ongoing Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and the associated restrictions, it has been decided to postpone the events until the same period in 2021.

ISDE Day ImageDarioAgrati Junior Australia USA Spain

ISDE Day ImageDarioAgrati Junior Australia USA Spain

Australia’s Juniors at the 2019 ISDE – Image by Dario Agrati

While the ISDE was not due to take place until late August early September of this year – between Lombardy and Piedmont, Italy – there are many influencing factors that made it necessary to take a decision sooner rather than later regarding the 95th edition of what remains the oldest event in the FIM international calendar.

The annual off-road event attracts several hundred competitors from more than thirty countries around the World each year, all of whom which have to commit to extensive travel and logistic plans several months in advance of the ISDE.

Moreover, the ISDE demands many months of forward planning and work to prepare many hundred of kilometres of course, all of which rely on the permission of the various local authorities and stakeholders.

ISDE Day ImageDarioAgrati

ISDE Day ImageDarioAgrati

2019 ISDE – Image by Dario Agrati

With this in mind the FIM, FMI and the local organising committee decided that in the best interest of all parties, and to ensure that the ISDE continues to hold it place as one of the most important events in the off-road calendar that all early decision to postpone the event was the right and proper action.

The 95th edition of the FIM International Six Days of Enduro will now take place from 30th August to 4th September 2021 with the 5th edition of the FIM Enduro Vintage Trophy from 2nd to 4th September, between Lombardy and Piedmont in Italy.


Penrite Honda throw down the gauntlet:
Off-Road Tyre Change Challenge

Penrite Honda have thrown down the gauntlet, announcing their Off-Road Tyre Change Challenge, inviting motorcyclists to post up their tyre challenge and time, tagging @Hondaracing_aus, with a winner to be announced at the end of each week.

The person that wins will get a set of tyres anywhere in Australia or America, thanks to Bridgestone and Penrite Honda.

The rules are simple:

  • The tyre is deflated
  • The bead can be broken
  • Tyre starts on the wheel
  • Take the tyre off
  • Put the tyre back on
  • No mechanical or motorised machines can be used
  • Tyre levers

Here’s a look at the Penrite Honda team showing us how it’s done:

Most importantly, don’t forget to tag @Hondaracing_aus and tell all your friends.


Jorge Casales fifth in shortened X-Trial World Championship

GASGAS Factory Racing’s Jorge Casales has been confirmed as having finished fifth in the 2020 FIM X-Trial World Championship, following the cancellation of the final two rounds of the series due to the Coronavirus pandemic.

Competing in four of the five events held, Jorge’s best result came at the X-Trial of Barcelona, where he finished third overall. Not competing in the second round of the series, Casales returned to action at round three – X-Trial Budapest. Despite many weeks of focused training and preparations ahead of the event, a tough night inside the city’s Sport Arena nevertheless saw the Spaniard match his opening round result in fifth.

Jorge Casales X Trial Barcelona

Jorge Casales X Trial Barcelona

Jorge Casales

Round four of the series was unquestionably the highlight of the championship for both Jorge and GASGAS Factory Racing. Competing in front of his home crowd, Casales not only secured his best result of the 2020 X-Trial series but also claimed his first ever indoor podium result. In finishing third alongside countrymen Toni Bou and Adam Raga, Jorge lifted himself to fifth in the X-Trial championship.

Unbeknown to riders at the time, the X-Trial Bilbao was to be the final round of the 2020 FIM X-Trial World Championship. Finishing fifth on the night, Jorge ended the series in fifth position, tied on points with fourth-placed Benoit Bincaz and just six points behind third-placed Jeroni Fajardo.

With the 2020 FIM X-Trial World Championship over, the FIM X-Trial of Nations is due to take place on the rescheduled date of November 6, inside the Arena Stade in Liévin, France.

Jorge Casales

“It’s a shame that the season has to end earlier than expected, but clearly the current situation is more important that motorsport. At the last event, in Bilbao, things didn’t go so well, so the next event in Andorra was very important to me as an opportunity to gain championship points. I was preparing myself well for that race but with how the situation is at the moment it’s time to stay home and hope that the situation improves soon. Then I will get ready for the Trial World Championship. We will also push for the Spanish championship, which we lead at the moment – I’m really focused on the start of the outdoor season. I want to thank the team for the work done and the effort that everyone puts in. I’m really happy with the new team, my first year back at GASGAS, and being able to make a podium in the X-Trial series was great. We keep improving every week.”

X-Trial World Championship 2020 Final Standings

  1. Toni Bou – Montesa/Spain – 100 points
  2. Adam Raga – TRS/Spain – 75
  3. Jeroni Fajardo – Sherco/Spain – 34
  4. Benoit Bincaz – Beta/France – 28
  5. Jorge Casales – GasGas/Spain – 28
  6. Jaime Busto – Vertigo/Spain – 28

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Kirk Gibbs talks the 2020 MX1 NZ Motocross Championship

After a four round, every race battle of death with Cody Cooper, Yamaha’s Kirk Gibbs emerged as the 2020 MX1 New Zealand Motocross Champion, making him a two time winner. After a few quiet drinks with the JCR team in Taupo, Gibbs flew back to Australia and was immediately quarantined in his own house as part of the war against Covid- 19.

With his two week ban coming to an end, Yamaha Motor Australia got the inside scoop from the champ to see how his championship unfolded.

On paper, the New Zealand championship doesn’t look as difficult to win as it always turns out to be. Australian riders have struggled there in the past and really the only two riders to have won there in the past decade are yourself and Jay Wilson. What makes winning a NZ National so hard?

“Cody Cooper makes it hard in MX1. He is an experienced and determined racer that knows how to get it done in NZ. He knows the tracks extremely well, is an awesome starter and still carries good speed for the full 20 minutes. This year, I think I had a little bit of speed on him but my starts at round one weren’t so good, but I worked hard on those and once I was able to be a consistent top three starter, the race results came a little easier. But racing Cody in New Zealand is a challenge and he is still a great rider.”

Altherm JCR Yamahas Kirk Gibbs wins the Fox New Zealand Motocross Championships MX title

Altherm JCR Yamahas Kirk Gibbs wins the Fox New Zealand Motocross Championships MX title

Kirk Gibbs

Again, it came down to a last race deal with yourself and Cody Cooper but you did have small points buffer on him going into the last race, so were you confident you could get the job done?

Kirk Gibbs: “I had a seven point buffer going into the last race and that was because I won the first moto of the day which not only gave me some extra points but also some confidence to run his speed at Taupo. I was confident going into the last race as with seven points, I could still finish third and secure the championship and because the depth isn’t that strong in MX1 in New Zealand at the moment, I knew I just had to get a good start, stay out of trouble and that would be enough to get the championship.”

The relationship between Yamaha, JCR and CDR is a close and strong one and you have worked a deal to ride with both race teams, how does that work and come about?

Kirk Gibbs: “I guess it started from the relationship both Josh and Craig formed several years ago when Josh was racing for CDR. A lot of the team sponsors carry over and it makes an easy transition between the two race teams and both work together to get the best results for us. Craig came over for a round this year to see how things were going and worked with Josh so its really a unified team and a great environment to be in.”

Altherm JCR Yamahas Kirk Gibbs at the Fox NZ Motocross Championship Balclutha

Altherm JCR Yamahas Kirk Gibbs at the Fox NZ Motocross Championship Balclutha

Kirk Gibbs – Image by CD Photography

What about the management style of Josh and Craig? Two completely different kinds of guys yet they both get the job done?

Kirk Gibbs: “They are both different, but I think they are more alike in a lot of ways. Both are ex successful racers, both run successful race teams, both are determined and passionate about racing and both are intense in their own individual ways. Craig is more a hands-on guy who likes to get involved with the rider and solve issues or problems while Josh tends to let things roll a bit until he feels they are going off track and he then steps in and rights everything. Both have a huge amount of racing knowledge and its great to have both of them there to help when required.”

What are the differences between your JCR and your CDR Yamaha YZ450F?

Kirk Gibbs: “The bike I race in New Zealand is virtually standard. We can’t run race gas in New Zealand, the motor is standard apart from an exhaust system but having said that, the only difference is I run a GYTR head on my Australian bike and some race fuel. A standard 450 is so good these days, you don’t need a lot of things done to it to be competitive anywhere in the world.”

New Zealand MX Rnd Altherm JCR Yamaha Kirk Gibbs MX

New Zealand MX Rnd Altherm JCR Yamaha Kirk Gibbs MX

Kirk Gibbs – Image by Clmintiepix

Why do you keep going back to NZ. You have been going for five years now?

Kirk Gibbs: “Because I don’t do supercross, doing the New Zealand Nationals makes perfect season for me and the same length as the guys that do supercross. The fact that working between CDR and JCR is seamless and the timing is perfect for our season, then I’m always happy to do them. It also works as the perfect preparation for our MX Nationals. The tracks in NZ are great to ride and well prepared, the intensity of a 20 minute race is good, and the people treat me well, so I love going over there.”

What have you been doing since you got back? Going crazy looking at the same four walls?

Kirk Gibbs: “My two week isolation is up tomorrow, so I am looking forward to that even if its just to get out and go for a cycle or a run down the beach. Like most athletes, sitting still drives me crazy and my partner has been home as well and I’m sure I am starting to drive her mad, so she will be happy to see my get outside in the coming days.”

Altherm JCR Yamahas Kirk Gibbs centre and Kayne Lamont right finished in the final moto in Rotorua.

Altherm JCR Yamahas Kirk Gibbs centre and Kayne Lamont right finished in the final moto in Rotorua.

Kirk Gibbs tops the podium at Rotorua

What are your thoughts on the 2020 season? How does this break effect your training and preparation?

Kirk Gibbs: “We just have to take the information as it comes and be ready when things are good to go. The isolation break has probably done me some good as I had a big three month block of training prior to New Zealand and now after the two week break, I will probably do something similar again and have another three month block that will take us to the end of June where hopefully we might be able to race again.”


Billy Bolt talks winning the 2020 SuperEnduro World Championship

Bouncing back from injury in the best possible way, Billy Bolt claimed this year’s FIM SuperEnduro World Championship to deliver Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing back-to-back indoor titles. Ending his rookie campaign as runner-up in 2018, a serious leg injury shortly after clinching the World Enduro Super Series title saw one of the enduro’s most-promising riders forced to sit out the 2019 SuperEnduro season.

Billy Bolt SuperEnduro

Billy Bolt SuperEnduro

Billy Bolt – 2020 SuperEnduro World Championship

For 2020 Bolt was determined to finally show what he was capable of. With the Husqvarna FE 350 mounted rider securing seven race wins from 12 starts, Billy clinched the title in style, proving himself a World Champion indoors and out.

After sitting out the 2019 series due to injury, where did your expectations lie entering round one? Did you believe you could immediately become a serious title contender?

Billy Bolt: “When I was testing and training with other riders, I got a feeling of where I was at and I was happy with my speed going into round one, based on their speed. Of course, once you get inside the stadium things do change. Also, Poland was still only my sixth SuperEnduro race and I had missed a full season racing indoors, too. I was nervous about things, but confident in how I had prepared.”

Billy Bolt SuperEnduro

Billy Bolt SuperEnduro

Billy Bolt – 2020 SuperEnduro World Championship

You talked a lot about consistency throughout the season. How difficult is it to find that in SuperEnduro, especially in the heat of the battle?

“It’s incredibly difficult to stay consistent in SuperEnduro. With the start order reversed for race two, it can really shake things up with a lot of overtaking to be done. Also, the intensity of each race means it’s difficult to stay consistent. So much changes which makes it such an exciting sport. I worked a lot on improving my consistency in Spain and Hungary and as a result managed to win five of the six races. Overall, I won seven races from 12 starts.”

Topping superpole on three out of four occasions is quite the contrast to your 2018 season. What have you learned to become so fast over one qualifying lap?

“Superpole was something I was keen to improve on from my first season. I was dreadful at it during 2018. Back then I struggled to commit to what I believed was the fastest line around the course. I spent too much time watching what others were doing. Even on the sighting lap I was still questioning myself and that’s the time to have it dialled and pieced together in your head. So often I crashed because I wasn’t committed enough. Now I’ve put that behind me. I’ve gained trust more in myself and the process. Superpole performances were probably one of the biggest improvements I made this year.”

Billy Bolt SuperEnduro

Billy Bolt SuperEnduro

Billy Bolt – 2020 SuperEnduro World Championship

Germany was a technical track where many felt that you would dominate on, but it was arguably your toughest round. Was it simply a case of pushing too hard, trying too hard to win?

“Germany was a tough track to get right. I felt good in training and I had different lines to most people. My rhythm in the matrix and rock corner was a lot faster than everyone else, but unfortunately there’s no points for practice. I just didn’t put it together on the night. I was upset with how I rode superpole and then fell and got my handlebars stuck in my boot while leading the opening race. It wasn’t until after the event that I watched the video of the race and saw I had about a 15-second lead, before those mistakes. After that I learned to manage my races better and pay attention to who is around me if I’m leading.”

Arguably the most difficult part of SuperEnduro racing are the tracks themselves – conditions change throughout the night and from round to round. How important is it having a team like Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing in your corner?

“The Prestige class don’t get to ride the track when it’s fresh. A lot of categories have already laid down some lines, so it doesn’t change too drastically for us. Practice and timed training can be quite hectic though because we don’t get that much setup time on the track. So, having a team like Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing in my corner is critical. They are spotting new lines as they develop and are giving feedback after each session so we can be at our best for when the start gate drops.”

Billy Bolt SuperEnduro

Billy Bolt SuperEnduro

Billy Bolt – 2020 SuperEnduro World Championship

Despite you being a ‘bigger’ rider, you raced the FE 350 for SuperEnduro. Does it offer the right balance of power, speed and agility for you?

“I prefer the FE 350 for SuperEnduro. You can be super aggressive on it and that suits my style indoors. It’s also lighter than the FE 450, which means I can muscle it around better through the sections, like you would the FE 250. It’s got the best of both worlds and is now the bike of choice indoors.”

Now a two-time World Champion – indoors and out – has it taken you by surprise how far you’ve come in such a short space of time?

“Yeah, it’s a crazy feeling. I’m now a two-time World Champion at 22 years of age. And I’m also relatively new to this sport, too – I only started riding an enduro bike four years ago. I feel proud of how far I’ve come, but at the same time I still feel like I’m only getting started and have a lot more to prove to myself.”

Billy Bolt SuperEnduro

Billy Bolt SuperEnduro

Billy Bolt – 2020 SuperEnduro World Championship

Although we currently face a challenging outdoor season due to COVID-19, are both body and mind now in a good place to carry this winning momentum into the WESS Enduro World Championship and fight for the World title you won in 2018?

“The situation we’re in is frustrating, but people’s health is more important than race results at this time. I’m in good form and eager to race when we get the call. I feel good even though my leg is not yet 100 per cent. If we do face an extended break in racing, I’ll use that to my advantage to keep rehabbing and building on what I’ve achieved with it so far.”

Social media is an important part of being a professional athlete and you certainly bring fire to the game. Do you enjoy making those video clips and do they help you push the limits of what’s possible on a bike?

“I enjoy it a lot and I hope that comes across on screen. Like anything social media has its positives and negatives, but it’s good to share these videos and show that we have a fun side to our riding, too. It’s not always about putting in the motos. I like to get creative too and it’s cool that people seem to enjoy that. If it brightens up someone’s day, I’m happy.”

Finally, what will it mean to return to SuperEnduro in December as World Champion with the #1 plate?

“At the moment it does feel strange being the SuperEnduro World Champion because I didn’t get those end-of-season podium celebrations. But returning to Poland in December with the #1 plate on my Husqvarna will definitely cement what’s been achieved this year. When I think about what has happened during the last 12 months, it hits home. Last year I was sat in hospital wondering if my foot would ever work again, while watching the racing go on without me. So, to come back in such a dominant way is great for myself and the whole team. We’ve finally got to show what we were capable of all along.”

2020 SuperEnduro World Championship – Final Standings

  1. Billy Bolt (Husqvarna) 227 points
  2. Taddy Blazusiak (KTM) 209
  3. Jonny Walker (KTM) 192
  4. Alfredo Gómez (Husqvarna) 161
  5. Blake Gutzeit (Husqvarna) 112

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Cory Texter talks American Flat Track 2020

2019 served as the crowning achievement of Cory Texter’s long and varied career as a professional flat track racer. It had it all – runs of undeniable brilliance, demoralizing defeats and the resulting crises of confidence, title-winning glory, and personal tragedy.

Ultimately, the year saw the achievement of a lifelong goal; Texter was crowned the 2019 AFT Production Twins National Champion, and that’s something that can never be taken away from him. But now it’s 2020. What can he deliver as an encore?

AFT Meadowlands Mile Prod Twins Corey Texter ERV

AFT Meadowlands Mile Prod Twins Corey Texter ERV

Corey Texter – 2019 AFT – Meadowlands Mile – Image by Scott Hunter

A few days prior to the Daytona TT’s original date, Texter’s top-secret plan to race as a wild card in the premier-class opener was made public. Unfortunately, that plan was almost immediately derailed when the nation, like the world, effectively came to a screeching halt as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Rather than fly the flag for the AFT Production Twins class in the first-ever AFT SuperTwins race, Texter packed his bags and returned to Pennsylvania.

Corey Texter: “The Friday before DAYTONA was scheduled to go, I took my family back home. After training in Florida for six or seven weeks, I went home, got groceries, and just got things situated so I could be in control of what I can be in control of. Since then, I’ve just been sitting up here, training and trying to keep things rolling as much as I can. It’s not too bad. I live right out of Lancaster City, which is suburb-y… I’m still allowed to go to a private motocross track I can ride at, and I can run and bicycle. I have a gym in my basement too. I’m just trying to utilize my time the best way I can and do things that the other guys might not be doing.”

AFT Meadowlands Mile Prod Twins Corey Texter ERV

AFT Meadowlands Mile Prod Twins Corey Texter ERV

Corey Texter – 2019 AFT – Meadowlands Mile – Image by Scott Hunter

Even though he’s retained the ability to keep his edge physically, it can be more challenging to remain sharp mentally, especially with so much still uncertain.

Corey Texter: “It’s really tough – just to find the motivation. Everybody is so bummed out about life right now. Training is pretty much a lifestyle for me, but it can still be difficult to structure things when we don’t know how long this is going to last. Ideally, you’d want to ramp up your training, but you don’t want to get burnt out from over-training either. I have ramped up my gym workouts a little bit, because I think I have some time to build up a little more strength. And I just try to ride as much as possible. My team has had some extra time to do some things with the bike that we didn’t necessarily think we’d have enough time to do before — more dyno work and things like. In that way, it was good to have a little more time. Obviously, under the circumstances, nothing was good about it, but it does allow them a little more time to prepare and get ready.”

The AFT Production Twins category is intended to serve as both a talent incubator and feeder series to groom future AFT SuperTwins stars. And its first champion – a rider with premier-class podiums on his résumé – almost immediately shifted his focus to a title defense rather than look to turn his 2019 success into a springboard back up the Big Show.

Corey Texter: “I think if I would have stayed on the path I was going – if I would have won more races – then maybe some teams would have looked at me and there might have been an opportunity. But for whatever reason, my whole career… I think there are people who still in the back of their minds are like, ‘Cory Texter, he can’t get the job done.’ I was on the podium multiple times as a privateer in the premier class one season. I proved time and time again that I have what it takes to beat the top guys, and I’ve still never been offered that elusive, no-worries factory ride or anything like that. And now I’m a little bit older and teams are looking at the younger riders and things like that.

AFT Meadowlands Mile Prod Twins Corey Texter FA

AFT Meadowlands Mile Prod Twins Corey Texter FA

Corey Texter – 2019 AFT – Meadowlands Mile – Image by Scott Hunter

“It’s frustrating but it keeps me motivated. If I felt like people were all in on me… I don’t know, maybe I wouldn’t have as much drive as I have right now. I’ve beaten every single rider in the SuperTwins class at one time or another on various racetracks. I’d like to race SuperTwins if I had the right opportunity and right program to do it. I still think I have some unfinished business in that class. But I’m really happy with the team I’m riding for and the bike I’m on.”

That fact alone underlines the importance of the Production Twins class.

Corey Texter: “The guys I ride for travel to the races in a van, and they built the bikes in their garage. And we beat a multi-million dollar team in Estenson Racing, and we beat the factory Harley guys. And we beat them consistently. It’s not like we had to buy a $50,000 motorcycle. It’s cool what the Production Twins class offers in allowing privateers to win races and earn championships. As long as AFT keeps the class on the path it’s on, I think it’ll continue to grow. I don’t want to see manufacturers buy their way into special treatment. Keep it production. Keep the rules cut and dried, black and white, so all the bikes remain equal, and I think it’ll grow every year. I think this class is just what the sport needs.”

Corey Texter back in 2018 in the Singles class – Image by Scott Hunter

Even prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Texter maintained a healthy perspective in balancing racing and life. This new reality has only further cemented that outlook.

Corey Texter: “I’ve always been a bigger picture kind of guy, and this is definitely bigger than racing right now. It bums me out for everybody, especially people losing their and everything else within the industry. I’ve been getting emails from sponsors saying, ‘Hey, we’re shut down. We can’t send you product.’ I come from a family-owned Harley dealership, so I know the struggles with the economy as well as anybody. And for me, as a professional athlete, it’s tough. I rely on sponsorship so much. I can’t just eat hot dogs and mac and cheese to save money — I have to focus on my nutrition. When you don’t have any money coming in, it’s tough, especially when we don’t know for sure when we’ll be able to race again. But at the same time, I don’t feel right to ask some of these people for money because they are struggling too. Like everyone else, I’m trying to come up with ways to just get through it.”

AFT Meadowlands Mile Prod Twins Corey Texter ERV

AFT Meadowlands Mile Prod Twins Corey Texter ERV

Corey Texter – 2019 AFT – Meadowlands MileCorey Texter back in 2018 – Image by Scott Hunter

Tragically, while the team, bike, and rider all return in 2020 to defend their crown, there’s a major void – mechanical and emotional – that must be filled. With Texter explaining:

Corey Texter: “Last November, Jon Reid, my best friend and my mechanic last year, was killed in an automobile accident. Jon went on the victory lap with me after my first win in Texas, and he was the first guy to hug me after I won the championship. Unfortunately, he’s no longer with us. That’s been really tough for me this off-season… just losing a best friend and somebody who believed in me and was constantly keeping me motivated. We have some other guys that are stepping up, some other friends of mine – Julian Sparacino and Adam Renshaw. I can hire good mechanics. I can hire the best set-up guys or whatever. But for me where I’m at in my career, it’s just as important to have people around me on race days that I’m comfortable with. Guys I know want to be there to help me, not just to collect a paycheck. I like to have that family atmosphere on race day.”

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Andrew Short talks joining Yamaha Rally Official Team

Joining the Monster Energy Yamaha Rally Official Team in 2020 is Andrew Short, winner of the 2019 Rally du Maroc and runner-up in the 2019 FIM Cross-Country Rallies World Championship.

The 37-year-old from Smithville, Texas, USA, who also has an FIM Motocross of Nations victory to his name, spoke of this new venture with Yamaha for 2020:

Andrew Short

“I’m really excited to join the Monster Energy Yamaha Rally Official Team. The bike, team and opportunity for me to conquer Dakar is really exciting and I look forward to the future and what it holds. Every time you join a team, there’s new personalities, team-mates, bike, personnel and all these things to look forward to. I know that to race at a high level you have to have a lot of passion and I do for rally racing, so I can’t wait to be around like-minded people, making memories, racing hard and enjoying it.”

Andrew Short Ross Branch Monster Energy Yamaha Rally Official Team

Andrew Short Ross Branch Monster Energy Yamaha Rally Official Team

Andrew Short & Ross Branch join Monster Energy Yamaha Rally Official Team for 2020

Short has impressed in all three of his Dakar appearances, finishing sixth in 2019 and taking another top 10 result earlier this year. Now, he has his sights set even higher.

Andrew Short

“My main goal for this year is Dakar. I’ve done well in the world championship; I’ve grown and got much better over the years in the rally. I believe I’ve got a long way to go and hopefully, my experience will keep growing so that I can have good success at Dakar, that’s the target. The main thing in rally is to be consistent. I’ve had success at a few races and then the next I might not be quite there. Dakar is a long race and you have to be consistent, so this is something I will work on. I want to be in the mix every day to put myself in the best position, minimise mistakes and be there at the end for the win. That’s where I hope to be and what I aim to work on this year.”


Toni Bou keeps rolling on two wheels at home

Toni Bou shows us how it’s done, even if you’re stuck in isolation at home. Probably not a great idea to try this yourself though… don’t say we didn’t warn you.

For the full interview see:
Toni Bou gets around the quarantine measures at home…

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Penrite Oils Honda Racing Team reveal MX Nats 2.0 livery

Australia’s Penrite Oils Honda Racing Team have revealed their new 2.0 MX Nationals liveries, with Team Director Yarrive Konsky positive the liveries will enjoy the same visual success as their previous ones.

MX Nationals Penrite Oils Honda Racing Team

MX Nationals Penrite Oils Honda Racing Team

Penrite Oils Honda Racing Team 2020 MX Nationals livery

Yarrive Konsky

“I love collaborating with Australian designer Sam Morton who owns SKDA. We have come up with some great liveries over the years. The 2.0 graphics represent Honda’s global direction with team graphics. We gave it our own unique look and colours. The gold really pops and highlights the premium products Australia’s made and owned Penrite Oils delivers customers” – said Konsky

The Penrite Factory Honda Team appreciates the support from Australian owned and operated companies during this trying time, with SKDA director Sam Morten proud of the partnership.

Sam Morten – SKDA

“Each year I can expect Yarrive to come up with several livery changes, I like how involved he is, it pushes my boundaries. Each kit has their own meaning. This year’s Australia day kit was representative of what our country was experiencing through the bush fires. It was amazing and we were able to raise awareness and money for some of Australia’s charities” said Morten.

Penrite Factory Honda Racing are patiently waiting for racing to resume, with the battle right now taking place off the track and the team urged everyone to follow all rules and regulations so everyone can get back to doing what we love sooner rather than later.

Yarrive Konsky

“This is unchartered territory; we need to be agile and flexible. We will be ready for racing when it resumes, and we urge everyone to follow all the rules set by the government. The sooner we can contain the virus the sooner we can return to some normalcy.”

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FIM postpone 2020 Speedway of Nations

Following health and safety directives issued by the governments of Germany and Latvia, amid global health concerns over COVID-19, the Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) and BSI Speedway have made the decision to postpone the first two events of the 2020 Monster Energy FIM Speedway of Nations in Landshut, Germany on April 25 and Daugavpils, Latvia on May 2 respectively.

SPEEDWAY OF NATIONS

SPEEDWAY OF NATIONS

2020 Speedway of Nations postponed

Furthermore, on the advice of Public Health England and in line with UK government emergency measures on movement, which includes the suspension of outdoor events, the FIM and BSI Speedway have postponed the final of the Speedway of Nations, scheduled for Belle Vue, Manchester on May 8-9.

Paul Bellamy – Promoter of Speedway World Championships

“We know that fans will be disappointed by the postponements, but the health and safety of the entire speedway community is of paramount importance to us, and we trust that people appreciate that it is not possible to stage the events in April and May. We thank our fans, riders and partners for their understanding in these difficult times.”

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2020 Championship Calendars (Updated)

2020 MXGP

  • March 1 – Great Britain, Matterley Basin (EMX125, WMX)
  • March 8 – The Netherlands, Valkenswaard – (EMX250, WMX)
  • June 7 – Russia, Orlyonok – (EMX250, EMX Open)
  • June 14 – Latvia, Kegums – (EMX250, EMX Open)
  • July 5 – Italy, Maggiora – (EMX Open, WMX)
  • July 19 – Trentino, Pietramurata – (EMX250, EMX 2t)
  • July 26 – Czech Republic, Loket – (EMX65, EMX85, EMX 2t)
  • August 2 – Belgium, Lommel – (EMX125, EMX250)
  • August 16 – Sweden, Uddevalla – (EMX125, EMX250)
  • August 23 – Finland, Litti-KymiRing – (EMX125, EMX250, EMX 2t)
  • September 6 – Turkey, Afyonkarahisar – (EMX Open, WMX)
  • September 13 – China, (TBA) –
  • September 20 – Emilia Romagna, Imola – (EMX125, WMX)
  • October 11 – Spain, intu Xanadu – (EMX125, WMX)
  • October 18 – Portugal, Agueda – (EMX125, EMX250)
  • November 1 – Indonesia, Jakarta
  • November 8 – Indonesia, TBA
  • November 22 – Patagonia, Argentina, Neuquen

2020 Motocross of European Nations

  • November 1 – Motocross of Nations, France, Ernee

2020 Monster Energy AMA Supercross Calendar

  • Jan. 4 – Angels Stadium of Anaheim, Anaheim, Calif.
  • Jan. 11 – The Dome at America’s Center, St. Louis, Mo.
  • Jan. 18 – Angels Stadium of Anaheim, Anaheim, Calif.
  • Jan. 25 – State Farm Stadium, Glendale, Ariz.
  • Feb. 1 – Ringcentral Coliseum, Oakland, Calif.
  • Feb. 8 – Petco Park, San Diego, Calif.
  • Feb. 15 – Raymond James Stadium, Tampa, Fla.
  • Feb. 22 – AT&T Stadium, Arlington, Texas
  • Feb. 29 – Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Atlanta, Ga.
  • March 7 – Daytona International Speedway, Daytona, Fla.
  • March 14 – Lucas Oil Stadium, Indianpolis, Ind.
  • March 21 – Ford Field, Detroit, Mich.
  • March 28 – Centurylink Field, Seattle, Wash.
  • April 4 – Broncos Stadium at Mile High, Denver, Co.
  • April 18 – Gillette Stadium, Foxborough, Mass.
  • April 25 – Sam Boyd Stadium, Las Vegas, Nev.
  • May 2 – Rice-Eccles Stadium, Salt Lake City, Utah

2020 AMA Supermoto National Championship Series

  • April 4-5: Primm, Nev.: Anthony Hart Memorial Race
  • May 2: Honolulu, Hawaii: Aloha Stadium
  • May 30: Dacono, Colo.: Colorado National Speedway
  • June 12-13: Austin, Texas: 25th Annual Republic of Texas Rally
  • July 31-Aug. 2: Trois-Rivieres, Quebec, Canada: 51st Grand Prix of Trois-Rivières (CMA/FIM North America sanctioned)
  • Sept. 11-12: Sturgis, S.D.: 8th Annual Streets of Sturgis (AMA/FIM North America sanctioned)

2020 American Flat Track

  • Round 1. March 14: Daytona 200 &  TT – Daytona Speedway, FL
  • Postponed – March 28: Atlanta Short Track – Dixie Speedway, Woodstock, GA
  • Postponed – April 4: Charlotte Half-Mile – Charlotte Speedway, Concord, NC
  • Postponed – May 2: Texas Half-Mile – Texas Speedway, Fort Worth, TX
  • Postponed – May 9: So-Cal Half-Mile – Perris Speedway, Perris, CA
  • Round 6. May 16: Sacramento Mile – Cal Expo, Sacramento, CA
  • Round 7. May 30: Red Mile – Red Mile, Lexington, KY
  • Round 8. June 13: Laconia Short Track – New Hampshire Speedway, Loudon, NH
  • Round 9. June 20: OKC Mile – Remington Park, Oklahoma City, OK
  • Round 10. June 27: Lima Half-Mile – Allen County Fairgrounds, Lima, OH
  • Round 11. July 4: New York Short Track – Weedsport Speedway, Weedsport, NY
  • Round 12. August 9: Buffalo Chip TT – Buffalo Chip, Sturgis, SD
  • Round 13. August 11: Black Hills Half-Mile – Black Hills Speedway, Rapid City, SD
  • Round 14. August 22: Peoria TT – Peoria Motorcycle Club, Peoria, IL
  • Round 15. September 5: Springfield Mile I – Illinois Fairgrounds, Springfield, IL
  • Round 16. September 6: Springfield Mile II – Illinois Fairgrounds, Springfield, IL
  • Round 17. September 12: Williams Grove Half-Mile – Williams Grove Speedway, Mechanicsburg, PA
  • Round 18. September 26: Meadowlands Mile* – Meadowlands Racetrack, East Rutherford, NJ

2020 Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship

  • Florida National, June 14 – Jacksonville, FL
  • High Point National, June 21 – Mt. Morris, PA
  • Southwick National, June 28 – Southwick, MA
  • RedBud National, July 5 – Buchanan, MI
  • Thunder Valley National, July 12 – Lakewood, CO
  • Spring Creek National, July 19 – Millville, MN
  • Washougal National, July 26 – Washougal, WA
  • Unadilla National, August 16 – New Berlin, NY
  • Budds Creek National, August 23 – Mechanicsville, MD
  • Ironman National, August 30 – Crawfordsville, IN
  • Fox Raceway National, September 6 – Pala, CA

2020 WESS Enduro World Championship

  • Round 1: Red Bull Erzbergrodeo (Austria) June 10-14
  • Round 2: Red Bull 111 Megawatt (Poland ) June 27-28
  • Round 3: Red Bull Romaniacs (Romania) July 21-25
  • Round 4: Tennessee Knockout (USA) August 15-16
  • Round 5: Hawkstone Park Cross-Country (UK) September 26-27
  • Round 6: Extreme XL Lagares (Portugal) October TBC
  • Round 7: Hixpania Hard Enduro (Spain) October 9-11

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Source: MCNews.com.au

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